Not All Female Candidates Are Running Because of Trump

Whether they’re greeting constituents at a train station, going to a tattoo parlor, or milking cows at a county fair, our candidates are working hard to win over voters.

Democrat Deidre DeJear would become the first African-American elected to statewide office in Iowa if she wins her race for secretary of state. Republican Pearl Kim, a former special victims prosecutor and sexual assault survivor, is running for a U.S. House seat left open by a # MeToo scandal. Democrat Anna Eskamani, a former Planned Parenthood employee, wants to become the first Iranian-American in the Florida state House. And at 21 years old, Republican Morgan Zegers is gunning to join the New York State Assembly as its youngest member.

In a year when more women are running than ever, each of our candidates has her own unique reasons for running for office. Watch Part 1 of our documentary series to learn more.

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Is the UN Failing the Rohingya? – Left For Dead (Part 3)

Watch Part 1 – http://bit.ly/1Tz0AgL
Watch Part 2 – http://bit.ly/1sacxna

In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country’s western state of Rakhine.

The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps; Human Rights Watch deemed the attacks crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region’s intricate and brutal human trafficking network.

In the final part of our three-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold reveals leaked internal UN documents that suggest an effort to keep concerns about the Rohingya quiet, and speaks to a former UN human rights officer about the organization’s passive response to the situation in Myanmar.

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Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia: Left For Dead (Part 2)

Watch Part 1 – http://bit.ly/1Tz0AgL
Watch Part 3 – http://bit.ly/1T5NA2t

In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country’s western state of Rakhine.

The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps; Human Rights Watch deemed the attacks crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region’s intricate and brutal human trafficking network.

In part two of our three-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold speaks to a police informant in neighboring Thailand about the discovery of mass graves that have been tied to human trafficking.

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Persecution In Myanmar: Left For Dead (Part 1)

Watch Part 2 – http://bit.ly/1sacxna
Watch Part 3 – http://bit.ly/1T5NA2t

In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country’s western state of Rakhine.

The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps; Human Rights Watch deemed the attacks crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region’s intricate and brutal human trafficking network.

In part one of our three-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold travels to Myanmar to investigate the violence and discrimination faced by the country’s Muslim minority.

Watch “Escape From Myanmar” – http://bit.ly/1O1SQk2

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Living In Fear: Gangs of El Salvador (Part 2)

El Salvador is set to eclipse Honduras as the country with the highest homicide rate in the world. There have already been over 5,700 murders this year in a country with a population of just over six million. El Salvador’s murder rate is now the highest it’s been since the end of the country’s brutal civil war — there is on average around one murder an hour.

The staggering death toll follows the breakdown of a truce between powerful, rival gangs and the government. The government’s decision to combat the gangs head-on has proved popular. El Salvador’s population is afraid to speak out in the face of the murders, intimidation, and extortion committed by the gangs, but the gangs say it is they who represent those living in the poorest parts of the country.

In part two of our five-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold finds outs what the gangs really want, and speaks with those living in fear.

Watch Part 1 “Waging War: Gangs of El Salvador (Part 1)” – http://bit.ly/1MNSHkQ

Read “El Salvador’s Gang Truce Is Getting Fragile” – http://bit.ly/1lo05fR

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On The DNR Frontline: Ukraine’s Failed Ceasefire (Part 1)

Watch Part 2: http://bit.ly/1fIAlrq

It’s been five months since the second ceasefire was agreed between the Ukrainian government and the Russian-backed separatists of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic (DNR). But this truce, much like the first, has not brought an end to the fighting.

Only a few days after this ceasefire was agreed, the DNR took the strategically important rail town of Debaltseve, trashing any hopes for a lasting ceasefire in the process. Since then, fighting has been constant. Dozens, possibly hundreds of civilians and soldiers have been killed, and serious efforts to get the peace agreement back on track have failed.

In late June, VICE News traveled back to eastern Ukraine to get a firsthand look at how it’s business as usual for soldiers and civilians on both sides of the frontline.

Watch ” Rebel Soldiers Hold the Buffer Zone: Russian Roulette (Dispatch 109) – http://bit.ly/1SJSL7S

Read ” We Witnessed an Initiation Ceremony That Turned Ragtag Rebels Into Cossacks” – http://bit.ly/1h0bFvD

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Historic Court Ruling on Murdered Daughter (Part 3)

Watch Part 1: http://bit.ly/1J4zRJd
Watch Part 2: http://bit.ly/1MPaTeu

A wave of homicides targeting female victims — labeled as femicides — has been sweeping the State of Mexico, the sprawling suburb that engulfs Mexico City. While government officials have not provided exact figures, the National Citizen Femicide Observatory estimates six women are murdered a day, and a United Nations body has described the situation as a pandemic.

VICE News investigates the murder of women in the region, and meets relatives of the victims who continue to fight for justice, from authorities who seem incapable or unwilling to help.

In the final episode, VICE News follows the Buendía family to the Supreme Court, where they hope to gain new answers from Mexican authorities after years of denial about their daughter’s fate.

Watch “San Pedro Sula Nights” – http://bit.ly/1BXzoTC

Watch “Buenaventura: Dismemberment and Displacement” – http://bit.ly/1Qp6lld

Read “All Female Murders Must be Seen as Possible Femicides, Rules Mexico Supreme Court” – http://bit.ly/1BZhGwq

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Female Murder Pandemic Continues in the State of Mexico (Part 2)

Watch Part 1: http://bit.ly/1J4zRJd
Watch Part 3: http://bit.ly/1K1V0Ch

A wave of homicides targeting female victims — labeled as femicides — has been sweeping the State of Mexico, the sprawling suburb that engulfs Mexico City. While government officials have not provided exact figures, the National Citizen Femicide Observatory estimates six women are murdered a day, and a United Nations body has described the situation as a pandemic.

VICE News investigates the murder of women in the region, and meets relatives of the victims who continue to fight for justice, from authorities who seem incapable or unwilling to help.

In episode two of the three-part series, VICE News met with journalists and forensic experts to learn why the Mexican government continues to ignore these gender-specific murders.

Watch “San Pedro Sula Nights” – http://bit.ly/1BXzoTC

Watch “Buenaventura: Dismemberment and Displacement” – http://bit.ly/1Qp6lld

Read “All Female Murders Must be Seen as Possible Femicides, Rules Mexico Supreme Court” – http://bit.ly/1BZhGwq

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Poaching, Drugs, and Murder in Costa Rica: Shell Game (Part 3)

Watch Part 1: http://bit.ly/1J2esAh
Watch Part 2: http://bit.ly/1QEgT01

Since sea turtle conservation in Costa Rica began in the 1950s, conservationists and poachers have peacefully shared the beach. But the murder of the environmentalist Jairo Mora Sandoval in 2013 shocked the eco-friendly country and brought attention to a violent overlap between conservationism and drug trafficking in Costa Rica’s abundant national parks and untouched coastlines.

With five percent of the world’s biodiversity, the unique geography of Costa Rica is a hotspot for eco-tourism and conservation work. However, it is that same geography that makes the country so vulnerable to the violent drug trade that surrounds its borders. Costa Rica has become a major transshipment point for drug traffickers, with deadly consequences for those caught in the middle.

In the final part of our three-part series, VICE News meets park rangers, drug dealers, and undercover agents who tell us what’s really going on in Costa Rica’s national parks and protected zones.

Watch “California’s Sea Lion Die-Off” – http://bit.ly/1QbTK4N

Here’s the Good News and the Bad News About Progress on Climate Change – http://bit.ly/1ff7lI1

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The Murdered Women of the State of Mexico (Part 1)

Watch Part 2: http://bit.ly/1MPaTeu
Watch Part 3: http://bit.ly/1K1V0Ch

A wave of homicides targeting female victims — labeled as femicides — has been sweeping the State of Mexico, the sprawling suburb that engulfs Mexico City. While government officials have not provided exact figures, the National Citizen Femicide Observatory estimates six women are murdered a day, and a United Nations body has described the situation as a pandemic.

VICE News investigates the murder of women in the region, and meets relatives of the victims who continue to fight for justice, from authorities who seem incapable or unwilling to help.

In the first of three parts, Irinea Buendía explains why she and her husband Lauro Lima believe their daughter Mariana was murdered by her own husband, a police investigator for the State of Mexico — despite authorities having ruled her death a suicide.

Watch “San Pedro Sula Nights” – http://bit.ly/1BXzoTC

Watch “Buenaventura: Dismemberment and Displacement” – http://bit.ly/1Qp6lld

Read “All Female Murders Must be Seen as Possible Femicides, Rules Mexico Supreme Court” – http://bit.ly/1BZhGwq

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