ShowBiz Minute: Stewart, R Kelly, Swift

Longtime Sept. 11 responders advocate Jon Stewart sees Senate pass compensation fund bill; R. Kelly spokesman steps down; Police: Man intending to visit Taylor Swift’s home with baseball bat arrested. (July 24)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1e447926fc2f143908ac83f1559b4ff3

Johnson extends lead, Stewart out of race to be next British PM | AFP

Rory Stewart is knocked out of the race to become Britain’s next prime minister, leaving four candidates led by former foreign secretary Boris Johnson. SOUNDBITE

Abonnez-vous à la chaîne de l’AFP, et pensez à activer les notifications
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCckz6n8QccTd6K_xdwKqa0A/?sub_confirmation=1

ShowBiz Minute: Stewart, ‘Toy Story 4,’ Thompson

Jon Stewart blasts Congress over 9/11 victims fund; Tom Hanks, Tim Allen attend “Toy Story 4” premiere in Los Angeles; Tessa Thompson doesn’t mind gendered title of her new film “Men in Black: International.” (June 12)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ecef6b882afb528c12cbe44e2887c861

Stewart felt ‘huge responsibility’ to define her sexuality

While promoting new movie “J.T. Leroy,” actress Kristen Stewart admits he felt a “huge reponsibility” to discuss her sexuality, adding that she felt she’d be “forsaking a side” whatever she said. (April 30)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/47935e77008930d253c3306096eff645

Man describes trying to stop synagogue gunman

Oscar Stewart says he pursued the gunman who killed one person and wounded three more in a synagogue near San Diego, California on Saturday. Stewart told KGTV in San Diego that he was taking part in services on Saturday when he heard gunfire. (April 29)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ca45c7f3202ca9ce6943ed05ba703a73

ShowBiz Minute: Roseanne, Cardi B, Stewart

(27 Jul 2018) Roseanne Barr on racist tweet: “I wish I worded it better”; New mom Cardi B drops out of Bruno Mars tour; Kristen Stewart to lead Elizabeth Banks’ “Charlie’s Angels.” (July 27)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/35c4966fcb77a7e6adddfccbb23ae761

Leslie Odom, Jr ’s $500,000 Gamble That Led To “Hamilton”

Leslie Odom, Jr., Tony Award winner and author of “Failing Up”, risked $500,000 for his role in “Hamilton.” His willingness to fail led to one of his greatest successes.

Learn more about Leslie Odom Jr’s new book.: https://www.amazon.com/Failing-Up-Risks-Higher-Learning/dp/1250139961

————————————————–

Follow Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider
Follow BI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/businessinsider/
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/

————————————————–

Following is a transcript of the video.

Leslie Odom, Jr: The willingness to fail led me to some of my greatest successes.

Leslie Odom, Jr: I was really tired of the rollercoaster. I wanted off and I was looking to transition into another career and Stewart said you can do that but I’d love to see you try first. I’d love to see you try before you quit. And this is after 12 years in the business already. And I looked at him like he was crazy. He said, I think you’re
sitting at home on your couch waiting for the phone to ring. The phone didn’t ring. So what did you do today? You have no control over the incoming call. You have no control over the opportunities that will come to you but you have all the control over how you spend your day and what you put your energy toward.

Odom, Jr:  More often than not, what I’ve found in my particular path is it really was just the willingness to fail. Willingness to fail didn’t actually lead to failure. In some way, it led to these
moments of real change when, oh that’s, I thought the limit of my ability was right here but it’s actually, it’s a lot farther. I didn’t realize that the ceiling was so high. You don’t find that out until you’re willing to fall on your face trying to tap it.

Odom, Jr: What I saw on that last row at Vassar was something daring and fresh, you know, the first eight bars of that show is like some of the best writing for the theater ever. And that was just the first song. The fact that it kept topping itself, that it sustained that level of excellence was astonishing. Three, four months later I got an email from Lin. And he’s getting a group of people together to read through it and because I’d seen it, you know I thought I had
such a leg up, only in that I knew what a wonderful opportunity he was offering me. What seems obvious now, the show’s so ubiquitous and it’s having such a wonderful life, it can seem like, oh that it was a given that it was gonna be successful but all of us, we were turning down work and making ourselves available for this off-Broadway hip-hop musical about the Founding Fathers, people were lookin’ at us like we were crazy. People were lookin’ at us
like we were out of our minds. We happily did it because we believed in it.

Odom, Jr:  The biggest highlight was the White House, for sure. With that President and that First Lady, it meant so much to me and to my castmates. To have 40 minutes of his, their undivided attention is a chance to change the world because we might do something today that lodges somewhere in his heart, her heart, the back of their mind. They might see something today, we might touch them in a way today that affects how they make a decision tomorrow. In this business that is like the highest honor and the greatest platform I’ve ever felt that we’ve had to make a difference.

Odom, Jr:  The thing that I learned the most from that was from that whole Hamilton experience was the importance of the willingness to risk. I walked away from a television show and guaranteed contract for half a million dollars and people thought I was nuts and maybe I was, maybe I was a little crazy but the bigger the risk, sometimes, a lot of times, the bigger the reward.

A Native American Tribe Is Using Traditional Culture To Fight Addiction

A year and half ago, Gabe Stewart stood in tribal court pleading guilty to felony charges because he stole money from his family to support his opioid addiction. In January, his community honored him for overcoming addiction and watched as his case was dismissed entirely.

Stewart is a member of the Penobscot Nation in Maine, a state hit hard by the opioid crisis. American indigenous communities like his are also some of the hardest hit, with overdose deaths for rural American Indians and Alaska Natives rising by 519 percent between 1999 and 2015, more than double the increase nationally.

When Stewart faced felony charges related to his addiction to Percocet, he was able to benefit from his tribe’s unique approach to addiction. Recognizing that issues with substance abuse in native communities often arise from intergenerational trauma, the Penobscot Nation attempts to reacquaint criminal drug offenders with tribal traditions and cultural practices to help them make a full recovery.

Tribal members who commit substance abuse-related crimes can enter a program called the Healing to Wellness Court, which operates something like a traditional drug court but offers a cultural curriculum.

VICE News followed Stewart on his last day in the Healing to Wellness Court.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo