Africa Weekly – a round up of news and features | AFP

This week on Africa Weekly, we focus on South Africa, where experts are working together to create vivid depictions of two recently discovered dinosaurs. And we go to Portugal, which is bucking the trend by trying to attract African refugees to boost the country’s economy.FOR SUBSCRIBERS OF AFRICA WEEKLY ONLY

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From rescue in the Med, to a migrant’s life in Portugal | AFP

Unlike many of its European neighbours Portugal is currently trying to attract refugees, encouraging immigration to boost their workforce and combat a dwindling population.

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LGBT+ Brazilians fearing Bolsonaro flee to Portugal | AFP

Portugal has seen an increase in immigration from Brazilians who fear repression from the country’s far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro. Bolsonaro is outspoken in opposing homosexuality. In an interview with Playboy in June 2011 he said he would rather his son ‘die in an accident’ than be gay.

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Portugal firefighters still battling against wildfires | AFP

Portuguese firefighters continue to battle wildfires in a central region where dozens of people were killed in huge blazes in 2017, as fears mount that strong winds could cause the remaining flames to spread. IMAGES

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Nearly 2,000 firefighters battle forest fires in central Portugal | AFP

Firefighters desperately battle wildfires as flames advance near the Portuguese town of Macao. Some 1,700 firefighters and 400 vehicles have been deployed in one of the biggest mobilisations ever seen in the area where 100 people died in huge blazes in 2017.

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AP Top Stories July 21 P

Here are the top stories for Sunday, July 21: Pompeo happy with progress on Mexico immigration enforcement; Iran releases video of seized tanker; U.S. accuses Venezuela of aggression over Caribbean; Wildfires in Portugal.

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Corruption frustrates hemp producers in Portugal

Since medical Cannabis companies have been heavily favored by the Portuguese government, it is possible that they managed to influence the bureaucracy to blockage hemp. This is not such an unreasonable assumption when considering that Ângelo Correia, co-founder of the PSD and ex-Minister of internal affairs has 40% shares of @TerraVerde (a medical Cannabis company from Israel) (Source dn.pt) or Jaime Gama, former president of the General Assembly is consultant to @Tilray Portugal, a branch of a Canadian medical Cannabis company (Source: publico.pt). What would be the reason of connecting such ‘advocates’ with political connections to your business if not for those reasons? And given Portugal’s current state of affairs when it comes to corruption, the idea might not be too far fetched. The Portugal Corruption Report of GAN – an anti-corruption organisation) states:
“While the country has made significant progress in the past decade, recurring corruption scandals involving high-level politicians, local administrators, and businesses abusing public funds have revealed that safeguards to counter corruption, and abuses of power have been somewhat inefficient in Portugal.” (Source ganintegrity.com)

But why should medical Cannabis industries have an interest in blocking industrial hemp? The explanation is simple. Conditions for the plant are good in Portugal, if not to say excellent. The medical Cannabis companies want to make as much money as possible by saving operation cost. The cheapest way to grow is in the field, outdoors. Why is that a problem with industrial hemp around? Because the industrial hemp could pollinate the medical crops, causing seeds to appear in their feminized crops, costing them money. Of course the problem could be solved by growing in greenhouses with appropriate filters. This way hemp and medical Cannabis could coexist peacefully. Obviously it would be cheaper to pull some strings in the back.

Cannabis News Network is a news journal which publishes only cannabis related news.

Find out more: http://www.cannabisnewsnetwork.com/