Jake Gyllenhaal’s first art purchase: A New Yorker photo

Jake Gyllenhaal says his first art purchase came straight from the pages of the New Yorker magazine. He stars as an art critic alongside Zawe Ashton in the Netflix thriller “Velvet Buzzsaw.” (March 6)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6a31440893606d5e4a2124135543817e

Mueller’s Investigation Has Created An Underworld Of Online Sleuths (HBO)

Sorting through the data of the dead — their pots, their knives, and the rocks they cooked on — in order to reconstruct how they once lived, is not so different from tracking the Special Counsel investigation.

On a Friday in February, Adrienne Cobb, 29, lab assistant in the archaeology department at Western Washington University, was trying to do both. She was digitizing data on artifacts found on a farm in Washington state that were about 3,000 years old, and keeping track of what was happening on Capitol Hill, where the House Judiciary Committee grilled Matthew Whitaker — then, acting Attorney General — about his involvement in Robert Mueller’s investigation into the Trump campaign and its links to Russia.

Cobb’s an unlikely candidate for legal sleuthing. She’s a recovering heroin addict with no experience in journalism, and a preference for Ghost Adventures over Reliable Sources. (“I hate cable news.”) She has dyed red hair, rocks Daria-esque glasses, and tends to look at the floor when she isn’t absorbed by a screen.

She spends her free time — and some of her office time, too — tracking every update, big and small, in Mueller’s probe. She’s part of an online community of digital sleuths, amateur journalists, and statisticians, who commit hours upon hours of their lives to all things Mueller. Some have launched careers out of obsessively tracking the investigation’s twists and turns.

But for her, keeping track of Mueller’s work is about helping others feel less “helpless” in a wilderness of fast-paced, complex news that doesn’t always add up. She calls herself an “aggregator,” which seems simple enough, but it’s tough work. She checks Twitter and Reddit three times an hour for new, relevant reporting, and saves links to those articles with the program, Evernote. Meanwhile, news of every White House departure goes in a separate spreadsheet that she’ll refer to in order to update her website, 45Chaos, which in granular detail, notes every staffer who’s left, whether and why they quit, resigned, or resigned under pressure (“R-UP”), and measures the length of their tenure in “mooches,” a metric born in Trump’s White House. (She goes by 10-days, not 11, though there’s a debate over how long Anthony Scaramucci really lasted as White House Communications Director.)

On the weekends, she wakes at 4:30 a.m. and never makes plans to leave the house for long — giving her just enough time for scan every article she’s saved to Evernote, for any new revelations. These get boiled down into weekly recaps that she posts every Monday to a Reddit forum called, appropriately, “Keep_Track.” Readers sometimes message her in appreciation or send tips, and her summaries have ballooned along with the news cycle to run as long as 5,000 words. On Monday, the process starts again.

“I get a lot of people who say, ‘I can’t believe that all happened in one week,’” she said. “Or, ‘That feels like it was a month ago, because so much has happened.’ So I think there’s value to seeing it all in one spot.”

There’s value, even for the other Mueller obsessives who, like Cobb, have become addicted to tracking the unknown-knowns.

Scott Stedman, a 23-year-old, started tracking Mueller’s probe while he was a political science major at UC Irvine. Within a year of graduation, his obsessive reporting and research has earned him bylines in major outlets and landed him a book deal (Real News, out in April). Stedman says he’s a fan of Cobb’s recaps. “I find them super useful. It’s a testament to how much information there is.”

Some of Cobb’s readers even donate — she makes about $150 a month through her Patreon account, and 76,000 people subscribe to the Reddit forum, where her work is pinned to the top, so any new members can get caught up on the fly.

“There was a New Yorker cartoon that came out this week that I think sums it up pretty well,” says A.G., the host of the popular podcast Mueller She Wrote, referring to a Julia Suits cartoon that some might see as an exaggeration but that many in this Mueller-obsessed world received with a ring of truth. The cartoon shows a conspiracist-type standing in a room, wallpapered in names ripped from Washington Post headlines, and string trying to connect them all.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo

This Activist Kept Watch Over Trump’s Camp For Immigrant Kids. Now, It’s Closing. (HBO)

Since June 2018, The Department of Health and Human Services and a private contractor called BCFS have operated a massive tent city on the edge of Tornillo, a little town on the Texas-Mexico border. Officially, it’s a migrant youth shelter for unaccompanied minors ages 13-17 who made unauthorized crossings into the U.S. Unofficially, it’s a prison for kids.

But whatever you call it, its operations have been highly secretive.

The federal government has released so little information about what goes on inside Tornillo that the best insight into the camp is a guy who has been standing watching outside its gates.

Josh Rubin is that guy. The 66-year-old New Yorker moved to Texas to protest and publicize what was happening at Tornillo. After spending three months there, Josh is going home.

In late December, weeks after it was revealed that BCFS had been neglecting to run required fingerprint checks on workers, HHS announced that it would not be renewing the Tornillo contract, And now is starting the camp down. VICE News has learned that Tornillo is housing just 850 children down from over 2800 it held at its height.

According to Josh, “There’s a reason for being out here in the middle of nowhere. They don’t want us to see. They didn’t want us to see what we saw. And now they’re closing it down.”

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo

ShowBiz Minute: Franklin, Bannon, Goldblum

(4 Sep 2018) The late Aretha Franklin’s family found eulogy by Atlanta pastor offensive and distasteful; The New Yorker drops plans to interview Steve Bannon during its festival next month; Jeff Goldblum surprised by giant statue in London. (Sept. 4)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d9f12fefa34fb33fa4d81c30737bd7a0

Farrow: CBS had ‘a very long window’ to respond to misconduct story

(27 Jul 2018) New Yorker writer Ronan Farrow says six women who accuse CBS Corp.’s chief executive officer Les Moonves of sexual misconduct had to overcome their fears of retaliation in order to tell their stories. Farrow says he spent eight months investigating the story published in the New Yorker on Friday. (July 27)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9b6d27df17b4b454fe1140b9c0219050

Actresses break silence with fresh allegations against Weinstein

Italian film star Asia Argento and two other women claim that disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein raped them, in a bombshell New Yorker expose that also included fresh misconduct allegations from Hollywood A-listers such as Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow.

Why Artists Don’t Make Money – The Business of Life (Episode 3)

This episode of ‘The Business of Life’ looks at two creative industries going in seemingly opposite trajectories: the fine art world, where the sky is seemingly the limit for the prices collectors are willing to pay; and the music industry, where the free-fall of record company profits has only recently begun to slow.

But at the root of each sector’s rising or declining fortunes is the underlying question: How should we compensate artists? And what value do cultural products create in a society? To get to the bottom of the issue, we’ve tapped the former New Yorker pop critic Sasha Frere-Jones, award-winning artist Ryder Ripps, and Glenn O’Brien, the founder of TV Party, original editor of Interview Magazine, and a former member of Andy Warhol’s Factory.

Watch “How the US Workforce is Changing (Episode 1)” – http://bit.ly/1I4IvVW

Watch “This is the Modern American Family (Episode 2)” – http://bit.ly/1A6yp5e

All content is the sole property of VICE News. Materials presented are for informational purposes only and do not necessarily reflect the views or endorsement of Bank of America. Bank of America, VICE and/or their partners assume no liability for loss or damage resulting from anyone’s reliance on the information provided.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos

What’s the Value of Creativity? – The Business of Life (Episode 3 Trailer)

The next episode of ‘The Business of Life’ looks at two creative industries going in seemingly opposite trajectories: the fine art world, where the sky is seemingly the limit for the prices collectors are willing to pay; and the music industry, where the free-fall of record company profits has only recently begun to slow.

But at the root of each sector’s rising or declining fortunes is the underlying question: How should we compensate artists? And what value do cultural products create in a society? To get to the bottom of the issue, we’ve tapped the former New Yorker pop critic Sasha Frere-Jones, award-winning artist Ryder Ripps, and Glenn O’Brien, the founder of TV Party, original editor of Interview Magazine, and a former member of Andy Warhol’s Factory.

Watch “How the US Workforce is Changing (Episode 1)” – http://bit.ly/1I4IvVW

Watch “This is the Modern American Family (Episode 2)” – http://bit.ly/1A6yp5e

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos