Mongolians react to country lockdown after first virus case | AFP

People in the Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar react to the country going into lockdown to prevent the spread of the virus. In Mongolia’s first confirmed virus case, a French national arrived on March 2 on a flight from Moscow and was supposed to remain in quarantine in his hotel for 14 days but ignored the rule, according to authorities.

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New smokeless fuel proves fatal in Mongolia | AFP

Newly government-issued coal causes widespread health problems and deaths in Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar also known to be one of the most polluted cities in the world. Mongolian officials say the briquettes last longer and emit fewer fumes.

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AP Top Stories August 8 A

Here’s the latest for Thursday August 8th: 200 mayors want Senate to return to session, deal with gun legislation; Trump returns from Dayton, El Paso; 4 stabbed to death in Southern California; US Defense Sec. presented with horse in Mongolia.

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US Defense Sec. presented with horse in Mongolia

Mongolian Defense Minister Nyamaagiin Enkhbold presented US Defense Secretary Mark Esper with a horse on Thursday in Ulaanbaatar. Esper named the horse “Marshall,” for General George Marshall, who served as US Defense Secretary and Secretary of State. (Aug. 8)

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Here’s the latest for Thursday August 1st: Democratic presidential debate; North Korean weapons test; President Trump welcomes Mongolia’s President; Refinery fire and explosion near Houston.

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Siberia scrambles to contain swine fever after infected shipment

Russian authorities scramble to seize swine fever-infected sausages after getting test results from an eight-tonne shipment that had crossed the border from Mongolia. The agriculture watchdog in the Siberian region of Buryatia said in a press release it would destroy the infected meat that was imported on January 30. A store chain in Ulan-Ude, the region’s main city, was offering to give customers twice the amount they paid for any sausage returned.

Vostok 2018: Russia to conduct ‘largest-ever war games’

Russia is launching its largest military exercises since 1981. China and Mongolia are taking part too. But, as Murad Gazdiev reports, some see the drills as a rehearsal for a global war. READ MORE: https://on.rt.com/9cr0

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What Happens To North Korean Defectors After They Escape

More than 1,000 North Koreans try to escape the country every year. They risk being killed, imprisoned, or trafficked, as they escape through China, Mongolia, and different regions of southeast Asia. This is Yeon Mi Park. She escaped North Korea when she was just 13 years old.

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Here’s the latest for Thursday, March 15th: Several killed when pedestrian bridge collapsed in Miami; Security video shows sheriff’s deputy outside Florida school massacre; Trump administration accuses Russia; Wild horses return to Mongolia. (March 15)

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Here’s the latest for Wednesday, March 7th: Porn actress sues Donald Trump; California Gov. Brown says Jeff Sessions acting like Fox News; British police say former spy targeted with nerve agent; Mongolia celebrates long winter with ice festival.

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The Eclipse Doctor Heads to Nebraska For Solar Eclipse 2017

Kate Russo, 44, is a bona fide eclipse chaser, a member of a small group of hard-core, dedicated enthusiasts who make it their life’s mission to follow and observe total solar eclipses. Russo has seen 10 total eclipses so far, traveling to places like Madagascar, Mongolia, Turkey, Tunisia, and China.

Recently, her focus has been on the United States, which is set to experience a total solar eclipse on Aug. 21. Russo has spent the past year helping people living in the path of totality prepare for what’s coming.

The path for this eclipse stretches across 14 states, from Oregon all the way to South Carolina, but the majority of the 1,000 or so communities along the stretch are small; the two biggest cities are Kansas City and Nashville. Still, some 200 million Americans live within a short drive of the path, and eclipse tourism is expected to draw big crowds later this month.

Russo will be spending the big day in Grand Teton National Park, in Wyoming, leading a small tour of 30 fellow eclipse chasers who are flying in from around the world. But the majority of her focus on preparation so far has been with a cluster of small towns in Nebraska, in the middle of the path of totality. One town, Ravenna, with a population of about 1,300 is expecting anywhere from 5,000 to 15,000 people to visit during the eclipse — a bit of a challenge given that Ravenna has only one hotel with just five rooms. (Russo’s advice to the town: Set up dedicated campsites to deal with the volume.)

Even though total solar eclipses happen somewhere on earth once every 18 months, they don’t come around to the same place again very often. There hasn’t been a total solar eclipse in the mainland U.S. since 1979, which means anyone under the age of 40 living here has probably never had the chance to see one. Russo is excited to share the experience with a new generation.

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VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – October 24, 2014

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The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Turkey shifts position on helping Kurdish fighters get to Syrian town of Kobane, investigation reveals 18-year academic scandal at University of North Carolina, South Korean scientists solve mystery behind ‘weird’ dinosaur, and top drug manufacturers may collaborate to speed up ebola vaccine production.

TURKEY (annotate to: Turkey’s Border War)
Government to Help Group of Kurdish Fighters Reach Kobane
Two hundred peshmerga will be allowed to travel through Turkish territory from Iraq to defend the Syrian border town.

U.S.A.
Probe Uncovers Academic Fraud at University of North Carolina
Over an 18-year period, inflated grades and bogus classes helped thousands of student athletes stay in their programs.

SOUTH KOREA
Scientists Solve Decades-Old Dinosaur Mystery
Nearly complete skeletons discovered in Mongolia give paleontologists a clearer picture of a ‘weird’ creature with a duck’s bill, hoofed feet, and long arms.

HEALTH (annotate: The Fight Against Ebola)
Drug Makers in Talks to Collaborate on Ebola Vaccines
Johnson & Johnson and GlaxoSmithKline are among the companies under pressure to quickly respond to the global health crisis.

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