Michael Brown’s father seeks to reopen son’s case

On the fifth anniversary of Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, his father is urging the top St. Louis County prosecutor to reopen the investigation into the white police officer who fatally shot the black and unarmed 18-year-old. (Aug. 9)

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Ferguson Commission member Felicia Pulliam discusses the fallout from the Michael Brown shooting

Felicia Pulliam recognizes that more than a half-century after the civil rights movement, race relations in the U.S. have a long way to go. But she believes events in Ferguson helped move things forward. Pulliam, who is black, is a longtime advocate for racial equity and unity. She was among the 16 people appointed to the Ferguson Commission convened by then-Gov. Jay Nixon to address the racial problems in the St. Louis region that were thrust into the spotlight after Michael Brown’s death.

Mayor James Knowles III talks about how Michael Brown’s death changed Ferguson

James Knowles III, who is white, was re-elected to a third three-year term last year. He said the election was evidence that despite those who speak out at council meetings, he has plenty of support, including in the black community. Knowles, 40, is proud of the work Ferguson has done to reform its police and court practices, reforms that he points out began weeks after Brown’s death, long before they were mandated by a 2016 agreement with the Justice Department. The Ferguson Police Department drew heavy criticism in 2014 for many reasons: It had only three black officers out of 53 in a city that is two-thirds African American. Police were accused of racial profiling in traffic stops, of treating blacks with aggression. Today, Knowles said, the department is almost evenly split between white and black officers. Officers now wear body cameras. They’re more involved with people rather than just reacting to crime.

Filmmaker Chris Phillips talks about the impact of Michael Brown’s death

As unrest grew in Ferguson, many people across the country were getting their news not from traditional media but from online video, including livestreaming.
Filmmaker Chris Phillips was among those providing that content, in part because, for him, it was personal: He was black and lived at the time in Canfield Green Apartments, near where Brown was killed.
Phillips, now 38, didn’t fully grasp the magnitude of the shooting until the next day.
For the next several months, Phillips and other videographers were a constant presence at the protests, capturing images of police in riot gear and armed with military weapons clashing with demonstrators.

Activist Josh Brown speaks about the impact of Michael Brown’s death

Josh Williams’ mother drove Michael Brown’s school bus. In 2014, Williams and Brown were both 18 and knew each other, though not well. Williams said he was shaken by his death.
Williams, who is black, took to the streets of Ferguson the night after the shooting and stayed there for the months of protests that followed. He lived in a tent most of the time along West Florissant Avenue.
In December 2014, Antonio Martin was killed in a confrontation with police at a gas station in Berkeley, near Ferguson. In what he called a fit of anger during a protest, Williams grabbed a few things from the store and set fire to a trash can.
The crime was captured by a TV news crew, and Williams was arrested the next day. He was convicted and sentenced to eight years in prison. His only prior arrests were for disturbances related to protests.
Now 23, Williams is housed in a prison southwest of St. Louis. He said he spends much of his time counseling other prisoners, helping them prepare for life once they get out.

Michael Brown’s father speaks about his son’s 2014 death

When Michael Brown Sr. got that call about a shooting on Canfield Drive, he tried not to believe that it could be his son. Brown, now 41, arrived to find a sheet over the body. Maybe it wasn’t Michael, he thought. Then he saw the cap. A month earlier, father and son wore matching Cardinals caps at the father’s wedding. Michael’s cap lay on the ground next to the body.

Impact of Brown’s death still felt in Ferguson

Five years after Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, the town has seen changes but some residents wonder if enough has been done. (August 8)

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Michael Brown’s Mother Running For City Council

(10 Aug 2018) The mother of Michael Brown announces she will run for a seat on the Ferguson City Council. This comes at the same time she is pressing Missouri’s governor to reopen the investigation into her son’s 2014 death. (Aug. 10)

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This Was St. Louis The Night A Cop Was Acquitted Of A Black Man’s Murder (HBO)

For the Rev. Clinton Stancil, of Wayman AME Church, the Jason Stockley trial was a chance for a do-over. Three years ago, religious leaders in the St. Louis area stumbled through their response to the police killing of Michael Brown in 2014 and the weeks of violent protest that followed. They were slow to engage with the young protesters who were out in the streets; by the time they did, their calls for peace and calm were often met with complaints that they were old and out of touch.

Last week, with the verdict looming in yet another killing of a black man by a white cop — Stockley shot and killed Anthony Lamar Smith in 2011, after a car chase — Stancil was eager to take another approach.

He and his fellow clergy members wanted to be more organized in their response, should Stockley be acquitted. And they preemptively rejected the requests of state officials that they help keep a lid on protests, saying they would stand solidly with demonstrators rather than tell them what to do. “Any decision rendered by you other than a guilty verdict will make you liable for any ensuing unrest or acts of aggression,” Stancil said in a statement signed by several other local clergy. “In biblical terms, ‘The blood will be on your hands.’”

On Friday, VICE News Tonight was there with Stancil as Stockley was found not guilty — and as the ensuing protests that day turned into violence that night.

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