Facebook chief wants EU not China to lead on tech rules | AFP

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg urges the European Union to take the lead in setting global standards for tech regulation or risk seeing countries follow China as a model. SOUNDBITE

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Zuckerberg seeks to assure lawmakers on ‘Libra’

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress Wednesday, seeking to assure wary lawmakers about “Libra,” a digital currency in development that critics warn could be used for illicit activity, or pose threats to the financial system. (Oct. 23)

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French president hosts Facebook chief Zuckerberg

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg travels to Paris for talks with French President Emmanuel Macron, who is pressing the social media giant to honour pledges to crack down on the spread of misinformation and hate speech. IMAGES

‘Privacy-focused’ Facebook puts the spotlight on groups

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg lays out his vision for a privacy-focused social network as users choose to communicate in smaller groups and governments investigate the company’s business practices. (April 30)

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Wild, wild web: Facebook CEO asks govt for more internet regulation

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has asked governments and regulators to tighten the screws on digital companies such as his own, and slap them with sanctions if they refuse to abide by rules on privacy, political or harmful content.

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Early Facebook Investor On Meeting Mark Zuckerberg

Business Insider speaks with Roger McNamee, an early Facebook investor and author of the new book “Zucked.” McNamee first met Mark Zuckerberg in 2006 and quickly became a mentor to the tech CEO. McNamee explains how Zuckerberg has changed since their first awkward meeting.

Following is a transcript of the video.

Kif: I wanna get to Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg because they’re immensely powerful people. How did you meet Mark Zuckerberg?

Roger: So 2006, I got an email from a guy named Chris Kelly. He was the Chief Privacy Officer at Facebook. He says, “My boss has a huge business issue, and he doesn’t know how to solve it, and he needs to talk to somebody who’s been around a long time but has no conflicts. Would you take a meeting?”

Now, Facebook was 2 years old. Mark was 22. I was 50. And they had $9 million in sales the year before, and they got it basically from, you know, pizza ads. They didn’t even have News Feed yet. They were still just college campuses and high school students. But it was already obvious that he’d broken the code on social.

I take the meeting. He comes in my office. I go, “Look, you don’t know me, I don’t know you, I need to tell you something.” I said, “If it hasn’t already happened, either Microsoft or Yahoo is gonna offer a billion for the company.” And I gave him a whole bunch of explanations about what’s gonna happen, like your management team, your parents, the board directors, everybody’s gonna tell you take the money.

It turns out the reason he was coming to see me was Yahoo had just offered a billion dollars for Facebook. I basically hypothesized precisely what was going on.

Kif: But he hit you with silence, right? This is a 23-year-old, 22-year-old. He’s CEO, the hottest thing in the Valley. What did the silence feel like? What were you thinking in that moment?

Roger: So… I described this in some detail in the book because it was a meeting unlike any I’ve ever been in, and I don’t know how many people have ever had this experience of being one-on-one in a conference room that’s set up like a living room. So we’re in sort of comfy chairs, but we’re no further apart than you and I are. And I described this thing to Mark, and he hasn’t said anything yet. I mean, he’s introduced himself, and that’s it. There then ensues a silence that lasted almost five minutes.

I challenge you to be one-on-one with somebody and have them pantomiming thinker poses for five minutes and you not be on the verge of screaming. I mean, at about the three-minute mark, my fingernails were implanted in the cushions of the side of the couch. And at the four-minute mark, I’m literally thinking, “I’m gonna scream if he doesn’t say something.”

And when he finally relaxes and says something, I mean, I have no idea what’s just been happening. I’ve never been in a meeting where anybody ever did that before, but it’s also in some ways really amazingly cool because I’ve said something, and he’s thinking so hard about it and trying to decide, “Do I trust this guy I’ve never met before?”

So when he relaxes and starts talking to me, he’s paying me a huge compliment. And that part’s really obvious. It was obvious that this was… His first reflex was not to blurt out what was going on, and I’m looking that as, “Wow, in an entrepreneur who’s only 22, that’s a really good sign.” That level of caution, that level of listening, that level of thinking, I mean, I was already impressed before he came in, but after that, I’m going, “Wow, he is really one in a billion.

“So I ask him, “Do you wanna sell it?” And he said, “No, I don’t.”

Kif: Yeah, how have Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg changed since then?

Roger: I wonder because I don’t get to talk to them anymore. My last interaction with either one of them was October of 2016, and the last interaction with anybody at Facebook was February 2017, and they have very consciously not communicated with me since. So I can’t be certain.

All I can tell is from what I see. The Mark that I knew was really idealistic. He had this vision of connecting everyone in the world. The same way Google had a vision of collecting all the world’s information. He was gonna connect everybody, and he was so convinced of the merit of that idea that I think he truly believed that any means necessary to get there was appropriate.

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#Facebook #MarkZuckerberg #BusinessInsider

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Early Facebook Investor On Meeting Mark Zuckerberg

How 9 Billionaires Start Their Mornings

Getting up in the morning is hard for everyone — even billionaires! Both Jeff Bezos and Warren Buffett prioritize sleep aiming to get 8 hours per night. Oprah and Jack Dorsey meditate and exercise before starting their days.

Following is a transcript of the video:

Oprah’s morning is very involved. The first thing she does when she rises at seven o’clock is brush her teeth before taking her five dogs for a walk. While she waits for her espresso to brew, she reads a card from her ‘365 Gathered Truths’ box. Then, she turns to an app on her phone to read her daily Bowl of Saki. Next, she meditates followed by an hour long workout in the hills of her backyard.

Elon Musk’s morning is not as calm as Oprah’s. He also wakes up at seven, but he gets right to business. Elon spends half an hour reading and responding to critical emails while drinking coffee. He says he’s too busy for breakfast. After sending his five sons to school he showers, then drives to work. Sounds about right for someone who works up to 120 hours a week.

Twitter founder Jack Dorsey says he gets out of bed 5:00 a.m. He meditates for 30 minutes and then completes a seven-minute workout three times. After that, he has his morning coffee and then checks in.

Warren Buffett likes to sleep. He says he usually sleeps a full eight hours a night. He reportedly wakes up at 6:45 a.m. and starts his day reading newspapers like the Wall Street Journal and USA Today.

Jeff Bezos also values his sleep. He says he makes it a priority. However, Bezos reportedly wakes up naturally, without an alarm. He likes to hold high-IQ meetings in the morning before lunch, ideally at 10:00 a.m.

Bill Gates starts his day with cardio. The New York Times reported that Gates would spend an hour on the treadmill while watching educational DVDs. He says he enjoys Cocoa Puffs cereal but his wife, Melinda, says he doesn’t eat breakfast.

Many of us cannot imagine a morning without coffee, but Sara Blakely can. The founder of Spanx says she’s never had a cup of coffee. Instead, she drinks a smoothie made of frozen wild berries, dark cherries, kale, dates, cinnamon, spinach, cilantro, fresh mint, lemon, water, ice, chia, and walnuts. Blakely also tries to get a yoga session in at 6:30 a.m. before taking her kids to school.

Mark Zuckerberg stays true to his brand. The first thing he does is check his phone in bed.

Mark Zuckerberg: The first I do is look at my phone. I look at Facebook.

Jerry Seinfeld: Right.

Zuckerberg: Right to see — to see what’s going on in the world.

Seinfeld: Right, right.

Zuckerberg: And I check my messages. I look at Messenger and WhatsApp.

He also says he doesn’t like wasting time on small decisions which is why he wears pretty much the same outfit everyday.

Anastasia Soare is the founder of makeup brand Anastasia Beverly Hills. She also reaches for her phone when she wakes up at 7:00 a.m. Apparently, Instagram is the first app she checks every morning. She always has two cups of black coffee and eats a light breakfast while answering emails. Her personal trainer comes to her house most days and she exercises for an hour. And of course, she never leaves her house without doing her eyebrows.

MORE BILLIONAIRE CONTENT:
How Bill Gates Makes And Spends His Billions

How Jeff Bezos Makes And Spends His Billions

How The Obamas Make And Spend Their Millions

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#Oprah #JeffBezos #BusinessInsider

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How 9 Billionaires Start Their Mornings

As Facebook turns 15, tech giant is under scrutiny

(4 Feb 2019) As Facebook prepares to celebrate its 15th anniversary, the company is battling a stream of negative headlines. The world’s most popular social networking site was launched on February 4, 2004 by a Harvard undergraduate named Mark Zuckerberg. (Feb. 4)

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How Tim Cook Makes And Spends His Millions

Apple CEO Tim Cook’s estimated net worth is $625 million, lower than most of his tech CEO peers, and he spends his wealth much more frugally than many others. His leadership at Apple has led to a shift in philanthropic giving.

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#Apple #TimCook #BusinessInsider

Following is a transcript of the video:

Tim Cook is worth an estimated $625 million. As the CEO of Apple, he’s the first openly gay CEO in the Fortune 500. And in 2018, Apple became the first US company ever to be worth $1 trillion. But compared to his counterparts in the tech world, his net worth is pretty modest. Google founder and Alphabet CEO, Larry Page, is worth $53 billion. Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, is worth just under $70 billion. And Amazon CEO, Jeff Bezos is the first person in modern history to accumulate a fortune north of $100 billion

Cook doesn’t lead a lavish lifestyle and has said, “I like to be reminded of where I came from, and putting myself in modest surroundings helps me do that.” The Alabama native had a humble start in life as the son of a shipyard worker and pharmacy employee.

When he was promoted as Apple’s CEO in 2011, his base salary was $900,000, and has risen to $3 million in 2017. He also receives a cash incentive based on the company’s performance, which pushed his total pay for 2017 to over $12 million. But his net worth consists mainly of $622 million worth of Apple’s stock and options he has collected since becoming CEO. And $3.4 million of Nike stock options he gets as a member of Nike’s board of directors.

So, how does Apple’s leader spend his fortune? Quite differently than other CEOs of tech giants. In 2012, he bought a 2,400 square foot home in Palo Alto, for $1.9 million, the median cost of a home in Palo Alto in 2018 is $3.3 million. And his frugality doesn’t stop at the housing market. He reportedly buys his underwear at Nordstrom’s semi-annual sale.

But Cook does splurge when it comes to donating to good causes, a philosophy that differs from that of his predecessor, who lacked a record of public giving. He encourages his employees to give and has led Apple into many philanthropic endeavors. In 2011, he instated a company-wide, nonprofit donation matching program. Over the past 10 years, Apple has contributed $130 million to help RED fight AIDS, $100 million to advance diversity in tech, through President Barack Obama’s Connected initiative, $50 million to hospitals, and more.

Cook practices what he preaches, too. He’s donated to civil rights efforts and in 2018, he donated more than 23,000 shares of his Apple stock, valued at just under $5 million to an undisclosed charity. He also regularly makes campaign donations. He’s hosted fundraisers for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton and in 2016, he donated $236,000 to the Hillary Victory Fund.

Cook’s altruism even applies to his future financial plans. He intends to use his wealth to put his nephew through college. And upon his death, he plans to give away all his money to good causes. He told Fortune magazine, “You want to be the pebble in the pond that creates the ripple for change.” 

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How Tim Cook Makes And Spends His Millions

Facebook’s Political Ad Tool Lets Us Buy Ads “Paid For” By Mike Pence and ISIS (HBO)

Last year, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said making political advertising more transparent was one of the most important things the company would do after it was revealed Russians used the platform to attempt to manipulate the 2016 presidential election. But according to a small test run by VICE News, one of the new features Facebook rolled out this year is easily subject to manipulation.

In May, Facebook added a mandatory “Paid For” disclosure for every ad that relates to politics or what Facebook calls an “issue of national importance.” The idea is to lift the veil on the kind of inflammatory ads placed by anonymous advertisers that plagued Facebook during the 2016 race.

But when VICE News placed ads on behalf of prominent political figures such as Vice President Mike Pence, and Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez, Facebook quickly approved them. We also tried submitting an ad on behalf of “Islamic State,” which was also approved by Facebook. We were able to get Facebook’s approval for political ads that included these names within the Paid For disclosure.

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Zuckerberg slammed for refusing to ban Holocaust denial on Facebook

Facebook must comply with Germany’s laws banning Holocaust denial regardless of its own internal polices, authorities gave a warning to the company CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, who said Holocaust deniers’ comments should not be removed.

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Facebook CEO’s Comments Lead to Uproar, Change

(20 Jul 2018) Mark Zuckerberg’s awkward and eyebrow-raising attempt this week to explain where Facebook draws the line on misinformation, manipulation and hate speech caused an uproar and eventual changes to the online platform. (July 19)

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Zuckerberg Apologizes to EU for Facebook Lapses

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg apologized to European Union lawmakers Tuesday for the way the social network has been used to produce fake news, interfere in elections and sweep up people’s personal data. (May 23)

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Everything You Need To Know About The Hidden Ways Facebook Ads Target You

Facebook executives often talk about their mission as “bringing the world closer together.”

With more than 2 billion users, it’s true that the platform does connect people. But one thing that Mark Zuckerberg’s two days of congressional testimony highlighted is that simply connecting people is not how Facebook reached a market cap of nearly $500 billion.

At its core, Facebook is an advertising company. In 2017, 98 percent of its $40 billion in revenue came from advertising. It’s not your data that Facebook is selling, it’s your attention.

Facebook’s ad platform translates your clicks and posts into “user attributes,” and places you in certain categories for advertisers. For example, your activity could suggest an that you recently had a child, that you’re a Bernie Sanders fan, or that you have an “affinity” for certain racial groups.

One of the most powerful features is called “Custom Audiences,” which allows an advertiser to target individuals based on offline information such as email address or phone numbers. An advertiser can upload that data to Facebook, which will match them with its user base to find who they belong to. Then there are so-called “dark posts,” a feature Facebook is in the process of changing, which only show up in the news feeds of specific audiences and are completely hidden to everyone else.

These tools can be used by anyone who wants to advertise on Facebook, and critics say that’s an open invitation for malicious actors. Watch this video to learn more about how Facebook’s ad targeting works, and why it’s so effective.

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This Is What People Really Think About Zuckerberg’s Congressional Testimony (HBO)

Mark Zuckerberg may have finished up answering lawmakers face-to-face during two days of Capitol Hill testimony — but he and his “team” have a lot to follow up on. They owe responses to Senators and Representatives on at least 44 questions.

Many Facebook users who watched the testimony still have questions, too. In Denver, Pollster Frank Luntz talked a group of 21-to-49-year-olds, who both despise the platform’s tactics but at the same time, can’t live without it.

“There’s nothing else like it,” said 26 year-old Erin Finn. “But if you delete it what is there to replace it? How am I going to connect to my family?” She added, “You can meet — or you can reconnect with someone that you went to school with ten years ago.”

None of the panelists trust Co-Founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and felt like his answers on Capitol Hill rang hollow and felt insincere.

“You can’t have that much power unregulated in the hands of one CEO,” said Andrew Bunker, a 23 year-old legislative assistant. “He has, for my mind, little risk of losing his position because the unwillingness of us to change our social-media behavior.”

And while most were concerned about how Facebook might be using — or potentially abusing – their personal data, they were even more concerned about the long term impacts on democracy.

“I would ask him if he could stop making these mini propaganda machines,” said Jamie Javier, a 39 year old geotechnical engineer from Boulder, CO. “I think that is divisive and — yeah, just in general, bad for society.”

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Zuckerberg Ends Day 2 of Grilling By Congress

San Francisco State Professor Joe Tuman says Mark Zuckerberg’s congressional testimony promising better privacy protection rings hollow unless Facebook changes its business model. (April 11)

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