Mexico’s New President Has A Plan To Fight The Drug Cartels. It Won’t Work. (HBO)

The new president of Mexico was installed on Saturday, amid rising violence in Juarez. More than 10 years after the war on drugs was launched in Mexico, VICE News looks at current state of Mexican drug cartels as a new president prepares to take office on December 1, and a new phase in the drug war begins.

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Mexico buries 112 unidentified and unclaimed bodies

Mexican authorities buried 112 unidentified and unclaimed bodies in Juarez, at the border with the United States, weeks after the country was shocked by the news that an official truck of the government of Jalisco circulated through the streets with 273 unidentified bodies due to lack of space to keep them.

Migrants Are Crossing The Border To Escape Danger At Home Despite Trump’s Policies (HBO)

JUAREZ, Chihuahua — President Trump’s executive order barring migrants families from being separated at the border was welcome news to recent deportees and those preparing to cross illegally at a shelter here just miles from the Texas border, but they doubt any change in U.S. policy will forestall the migratory crush from Mexico and Central America each summer.

That’s how bad things are at home.

Israel Rojas, 32, was deported outside of Matamoros last week and arrived in Juarez on Wednesday, floral-pattern suitcase in tow. It was his fourth deportation. His next arrest for illegal entry could leave him in prison for 3-5 years.

Instead of risking it, he sent money to help his wife and four children moved from Virginia to El Paso, Texas. He’s looking for houses across the border, in Juarez, but worries about the violence. His family will visit him on weekends.

“Over here, you might not only see your children for a while, but at least you’ll reunite with them,” Rojas said. “Over there, you and your children are in risk of getting killed.”

While child separation was a horror, said Casa de Migrante shelter director Blanca Rivera, news of recent policy like Trump’s “Zero Tolerance” treatment of first-time border crossers hasn’t necessarily reached migrants in Central America en route to the U.S.

“Their willingness to migrate doesn’t change,” Rivera said. “They all
still have hopes and dreams in their minds, and they want to try and follow them no matter what.”

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Juarez launches app for women in risky situations to send alerts

With disappearances and aggression against women a common occurrence in the Mexico’s Juarez, the city launches a smartphone app called “I am not alone,” to allow women to send an alert to their contacts when they find themselves in a risky situation.

No Man’s Land Between U.S.- Mexico Border (HBO)

In June of 2010, a 15-year-old, unarmed Mexican citizen named Sergio Hernandez Guereca was shot and killed by an agent of the U.S. Border Patrol. The shooting happened in the riverbed of the Rio Grande, which, between the cities of Juarez and El Paso, consists of a mostly dry, concrete culvert. The U.S.-Mexico border runs, unmarked, down the middle of the river, and when the shooting happened, Hernandez was in Mexico, but the agent who shot him was standing in the U.S.

When Hernandez’s family sued for damages, two American courts threw out their claim on the grounds that Mexican citizens on Mexican soil were not protected by the U.S. constitution. The case went all the way to the Supreme Court, which heard oral arguments last week.

If the court decides in the Hernandez family’s favor, it could expand the reach of the U.S. Constitution — and it could also subject the Border Patrol to a new level of scrutiny.

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