How Border Patrol Agents Are Trained

In April, as the crisis at the US-Mexico border began to reach a fever pitch, Senior Video Correspondent Graham Flanagan spent four days inside the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico.

Before they serve in the Border Patrol, trainees must graduate from the Academy’s six-month basic training program.

While a majority of the training is focused on law enforcement operations, the Academy also emphasizes instruction in the Spanish language in order to enhance communication between agents and the people they encounter in the field.

The agency has been the focus of intense scrutiny in recent months due to revelations about reportedly squalid conditions at Border Patrol-run detention centers where migrants, including children, wait to be processed and released.

During our time at the Academy, we did not see any training — other than Spanish instruction — that was specifically designed to prepare the trainees to work in the detention centers or to care for migrant children.

This begged the question: is the training that occurs at the Academy adequately preparing the trainees for what awaits them in the field? In a statement to Business Insider, a United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) spokesperson said that, “The Border Patrol Academy does not conduct training related to detention officer duties… Once a trainee graduates and arrives at their station, depending on their geographical location, it now becomes the duty and responsibility of their station to further train the new agent on local policies and procedures.”

In regards to how trainees are instructed to work with children, the CBP spokesperson told Business Insider that “The Border Patrol Academy trains and teaches agents about policies and regulations related to the Flores vs. Reno/TVPRA. This is the current case precedent that governs children in short term custody.”

The 1997 Flores Settlement requires that immigration officials detaining minors provide food and drinking water, medical assistance in emergencies, toilets and sinks, adequate temperature control and ventilation, adequate supervision to protect minors from others, and separation from unrelated adults whenever possible.

According to CBP, trainees are also trained in first-aid and basic lifesaving measures.

MORE BOOT CAMP CONTENT:
What New Army Cadets Go Through On Their First Day At West Point

What It Takes To Survive Coast Guard Boot Camp

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#BorderPatrol #Immigration #BusinessInsider

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How Border Patrol Agents Are Trained

How Border Patrol Agents Are Trained

In April, as the crisis at the US-Mexico border began to reach a fever pitch, Senior Video Correspondent Graham Flanagan spent four days inside the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico.

Before they serve in the Border Patrol, trainees must graduate from the Academy’s six-month basic training program.

While a majority of the training is focused on law enforcement operations, the Academy also emphasizes instruction in the Spanish language in order to enhance communication between agents and the people they encounter in the field.

The agency has been the focus of intense scrutiny in recent months due to revelations about reportedly squalid conditions at Border Patrol-run detention centers where migrants, including children, wait to be processed and released.

During our time at the Academy, we did not see any training — other than Spanish instruction — that was specifically designed to prepare the trainees to work in the detention centers or to care for migrant children.

This begged the question: is the training that occurs at the Academy adequately preparing the trainees for what awaits them in the field? In a statement to Business Insider, a United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) spokesperson said that, “The Border Patrol Academy does not conduct training related to detention officer duties… Once a trainee graduates and arrives at their station, depending on their geographical location, it now becomes the duty and responsibility of their station to further train the new agent on local policies and procedures.”

In regards to how trainees are instructed to work with children, the CBP spokesperson told Business Insider that “The Border Patrol Academy trains and teaches agents about policies and regulations related to the Flores vs. Reno/TVPRA. This is the current case precedent that governs children in short term custody.”

The 1997 Flores Settlement requires that immigration officials detaining minors provide food and drinking water, medical assistance in emergencies, toilets and sinks, adequate temperature control and ventilation, adequate supervision to protect minors from others, and separation from unrelated adults whenever possible.

According to CBP, trainees are also trained in first-aid and basic lifesaving measures.

——————————————————

#BorderPatrol #Immigration #BusinessInsider

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How Border Patrol Agents Are Trained

A Day With Alex Trebek Behind The Scenes Of ‘Jeopardy!’

In February of 2017, Senior Video Correspondent Graham Flanagan spent a day behind the scenes of “Jeopardy!” at Sony Pictures Studios in Los Angeles.

On March 6, 2019, Alex Trebek, the 78-year-old host of “Jeopardy!,” announced that he has been diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. In a video message posted to the long-running game show’s YouTube channel, Trebek delivered the news with transparency, humor, and optimism.

“I plan to beat the low survival rate statistics for this disease,” Trebek said in the video message. “Truth told, I have to! Because under the terms of my contract, I have to host “Jeopardy!” for three more years!”

In addition to being present for the five episodes that were taped that day, Flanagan got to spend a limited amount of one-on-one time with Trebek, who has been hosting the show since 1984.

He got an inside look at Trebek’s pre-show routine, and got the iconic host to open up about his diet, his passion for labor-intensive housework, and the reason he’s never lost his passion for hosting “Jeopardy!” after more than 7,000 episodes.

Flanagan also recorded Trebek’s interactions with the live studio audience during commercial breaks, wherein he takes unscripted questions. “No subject is taboo,” Trebek said.

This visit to the “Jeopardy!” set came the day after a category that featured Trebek reciting rap lyrics went viral, making headlines due to his deadpan delivery of verses by artists like Drake and Lil’ Wayne.

Business Insider released a series of short videos produced from the footage captured in 2017. After Trebek’s announcement regarding his health status captured the minds and hearts of the show’s massive audience, Flanagan returned to the footage he shot that day to create a new, extended chronicle of his experience.

Some of the footage featured here was included in the previously-released videos, and some of it is being seen for the first time.

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#AlexTrebek #Jeopardy #BusinessInsider

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A Day With Alex Trebek Behind The Scenes Of ‘Jeopardy!’

Tracking Drug Smugglers And Unauthorized Migrants With The Coast Guard In Miami

After spending time at Coast Guard boot camp, Senior Video Correspondent Graham Flanagan travelled to Miami to see how the Coast Guard combats drug smuggling and illegal immigration from the air and the sea. 

In January, a Miami-based Coast Guard vessel was involved in the seizure of a boat carrying 132 pounds of cocaine. Earlier that month, a Miami-based Coast Guard airplane spotted a vessel carrying 35 migrants off the coast of Puerto Rico.

Flanagan spent a day aboard the Coast Guard cutter Robert Yered, which patrols the Port of Miami and the surrounding region that includes the Florida Keys and the Bahamas. Flanagan experienced a ride-along on a high-speed, water-jet powered pursuit boat used to quickly engage vessels for boardings and routine inspections. 

MORE MILITARY CONTENT:
What It Takes To Survive Coast Guard Boot Camp

What New Army Cadets Go Through On Their First Day At West Point

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#CoastGuard #Miami #BusinessInsider

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Tracking Drug Smugglers And Unauthorized Migrants With The Coast Guard In Miami

Why YETI Coolers Are So Expensive | So Expensive

YETI coolers have become a status symbol in the United States. The expensive, high-tech coolers range between $200 and $1,300. The technology used to make the coolers, combined with a highly effective marketing campaign, has made YETI a popular lifestyle brand that also makes apparel, drinkware, and even pet products.

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Following is a transcript of the video:

Graham Flanagan: YETI is known for its expensive coolers that have become a status symbol in America. This is their most expensive, the 82-gallon Tundra 350, that retails for $1,300. Since the company was founded in 2006, YETI has become an iconic brand. And they make a lot more than just coolers. Drinkware, apparel, and even dog bowls.

But the coolers are what they’re best known for. Like the popular Tundra 35 that retails for $250. But you can get a comparably-sized cooler from legacy brands like Coleman and Igloo for around $40. Why are YETI coolers so expensive? There are two pretty simple answers: technology and marketing.

The Austin, Texas-based company was founded by the Seiders brothers: two avid outdoorsmen who felt there weren’t any coolers on the market that kept their catches, kills, and beverages cold enough for long enough. They teamed up with a factory in the Philippines to create a cooler that they described as indestructible, with superior ice retention.

Their first cooler hit the market in 2006. If you were serious about keeping your catches, kills and “brewskies” as cold as possible, you needed a YETI.

Fisherman: Whoop. Don’t worry it’s a YETI.

Flanagan: So, how do they work? The cooler’s shell is made of a common plastic called polyethylene with a process called rotomolding, which uses high temperature and low pressure to create one piece of hollow plastic. Rotomolding is also used to make kayaks. The shell is pressure injected with up to three inches of commercial-grade polyurethane foam. And that’s what keeps your beers, I mean, that’s what keeps your catches and kills cold for so long.

The coolers feature a full-frame, freezer-quality gasket that seals around the entire lid to minimize air exchange. And I can tell you from experience, they work. But are they worth the high price tag? I asked on of those questions on my Facebook profile, and the responses were mixed.

“Definitely.”

“They’re heavy AF.” They are heavy.

“No.”

“There are cheaper brands that work just as well.”

There are some rotomolded YETI competitors like Orca, OtterBox and RTIC, that are slightly cheaper, but still comparably priced. None of them have been able to create the brand phenomenon that YETI has seen.

In October of 2018, YETI went public when they filed an IPO on the New York Stock Exchange. And the company’s market cap is now estimated at $1.5 billion.

So, how are YETI coolers able to carry that high price tag? Marketing. Highly effective marketing. And their campaign to ramp up the population of YETI nation is just getting started. The company recently hired the former head of marketing for Calvin Klein to be its Chief Marketing Officer. And the company’s effective use of the all-American, rugged, outdoor lifestyle keeps customers coming back for more.

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MORE SO EXPENSIVE CONTENT:
Why Louboutin Shoes Are So Expensive

Why Bluefin Tuna Is So Expensive

Why The New York Knicks Are So Expensive

#YETI #Coolers #BusinessInsider

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Why YETI Coolers Are So Expensive | So Expensive

What ‘Dilly Dilly’ Means — And How Bud Light Came Up With Its Viral Campaign

If you’ve seen or heard the phrase “Dilly Dilly” at your local pub or on social media in the last few weeks, you can thank Bud Light for turning the phrase into a cultural phenomenon. The company launched a series of ads created by the Wieden+Kennedy ad agency that has gone viral, thanks to their constant appearances during commercial breaks in NFL and college football games. 

Recently at Business Insider’s IGNITION conference in New York, we got to chat with the man ultimately responsible for the “Dilly Dilly” campaign: Anheuser-Busch InBev Chief Marketing Officer Miguel Patricio. We asked him about the origin of the campaign and — with the Super Bowl looming — if the brand has any plans to make any new “Dilly Dilly” ads. Following is a transcript of the video.

Graham Flanagan: What the hell does “Dilly Dilly” mean?

Miguel Patricio: “Dilly Dilly” doesn’t mean anything. That’s the beauty of it. I think that we all need our moments of nonsense and fun. And I think that “Dilly Dilly,” in a way, represents that. A lot of people asked me, “How did you approve that?”

[You can thank this man for the “Dilly Dilly” campaign. He’s the Chief Marketing Officer of AB InBev]

To tell you the truth, we never expected this to be so successful. It didn’t test that well. We did that ad, actually, because of – the new season of “Game of Thrones” coming, but when we tested, it didn’t test that well. We said, “Consumers will get it.”

And especially with repetition. We have a chance here for this to become big. So, we went against the research and we gave a chance to “Dilly Dilly” and we are so happy!

[The spot was created by the Wieden+Kennedy ad agency]

I think that one of the proofs of success,  nowadays, from a cultural standpoint, is when you go to Amazon and you don’t do anything, there are people already selling t-shirts. Two weeks ago, I went on Amazon. There were like ten different types of “Dilly Dilly” t-shirts. I said “Yes! That’s it!”

It becomes a cultural currency. 

Flanagan: You’re suing all those people, right?

Patricio: No, no. We want everybody to “Dilly Dilly” in their life, so no problem. We are gonna bring more fun, more Dilly Dillys … Super Bowl is pretty close. Maybe we’ll surprise you with a Dilly Dilly soon. I don’t know. Maybe!

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What Shaq Learned From The Failures Of ‘Kazaam’ And ‘Shaq Fu’

With career earnings that totaled $292 million and millions more from endorsement deals and movie roles, Shaquille O’Neal is undoubtedly one of the most successful sports and entertainment personalities of all time. He has, however, had a few stumbles along the way. In 1994, he starred in a video game called “Shaq Fu,” which was released on Sega and Nintendo consoles. The magazine Nintendo Power voted “Shaq Fu” to be the third worst of all time.

In 1996, Shaq got his first starring role in a movie as a rapping genie in Disney’s family comedy “Kazaam.” The movie underperformed at the box office, bringing in around $19 million. It didn’t fare well with critics either. It has a rating of only 6% on the movie review aggregation site Rotten Tomatoes.

We asked Shaq what he learned from these forays into the worlds of video games and entertainment and how it affected him moving forward.

Shaq recently stopped by Business Insider to talk about his collaboration with home security technology company Ring to raise awareness about how homeowners can better protect their property this holiday season. Shaq recently kicked off a campaign with Ring’s CEO Jamie Siminoff around protecting holiday package deliveries – specifically as National Package Protection Day approaches on Nov. 29. Following is a transcript of the video.

Shaquille O’Neal: If you watch “Kazaam” as an adult, you should be ashamed of yourself. That movie is for children, but because it was me — “The Shaqster” — you get all these Siskel and Ebert-type guys trying to critique the movie.

[The 1996 movie grossed only $19 million. It has a 6% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.]

You know, it was just me taking advantage of an opportunity, doing something for kids. I’m not trying to win Oscars and Emmys and Tonys. You know, think about it. A kid from the projects of Newark, New Jersey gets to do a major motion picture. I’m gonna take it every time, no matter what the script it.

Graham Flanagan: Did you make a lot of money from “Kazaam?”

O’Neal: I sure did.

Flanagan: What was your check for that?

O’Neal: You know I don’t like talking about that, but it was — it was nice.

[“Shaq Fu” was released in 1994 for Sega and Nintendo consoles. In 1997, Nintendo Power Magazine voted it the 3rd worst video game ever.]

That was on the end of analog and the birth of digital. Like, if I would have met those digital people I would’ve never approved “Shaq Fu,” but again, a kid from the projects of Newark, New Jersey wants to do a video game. People know I like karate. And it was cool, and then, like 30 days later, all these digital games come out. I was just like, “Oh, no.”

You learn from mistakes like that. I learned then to do your due diligence. You always have to see what’s next, because there’s always something next.

[A “Shaq Fu” reboot is in the works.]

It’s coming out. I just have to make sure it’s perfect. I’m doing something I’ve never done before, and I’m micromanaging something. They send me updates like every two weeks, and I’m like, “Eh, I don’t know yet.”

So, you know, the script has to be good. The effects — like, everything has to be perfect.

What people don’t understand about me is, growing up with a drill sergeant father, I’m programmed not to have my feelings hurt. I listen to people and I respect them. If you don’t like “Kazaam,” okay, I understand. I’m not gonna be like, “Forget you!”

It’s not my style. You don’t like “Shaq Fu?” I understand, but I’m not gonna be wasting my time trying to prove to you that I am a good actor. So, I’m not looking to redeem myself. I’m just looking to put out a pretty good game, and hopefully, the people like it. And if they don’t, then I’ll just try and come back.

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Tony Robbins hits fish food golf balls that dissolve into the ocean

When Tony Robbins whacks golf balls into the Pacific off the porch of his Fiji home, he’s not just living the peak luxury lifestyle, he’s feeding some of the local fish.

Business Insider recently traveled to Robbins’ Fiji resort Namale, where the world-famous life coach was hosting the winners of Shopify’s Build a Bigger Business competition. He gave us a tour of his private residence and showed us his stock of fish food golf balls.

Barcelona-based entrepreneur Albert Buscató invented the “EcoBioBall” in 2008 and began selling them through his company Albus Golf in 2010. He sells boxes of the balls on his website (100 of them will run you $116), and major clients include cruise lines and resorts like the Four Seasons.

Buscató had the EcoBioBall independently tested to meet the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidelines for biodegradability and non-toxicity. Fish can get at the ball’s fish food core after a day and a half, and even if no fish swam by to snack, the ball fully dissolves within 28 days in all water temperatures. Following is a transcript of the video.

Tony Robbins: This is another hangout area that we really love. I opened this up because I have “fish balls.” I have these golf balls that are full of fish food, and so we use these as holes here and we come out and knock balls here. These fish food ones — you knock these out and then they dissolve in the ocean and provide the food. So, they’re ecologically sound, but also the fish love it. It’s kinda cool.

Graham Flanagan: So, that’s full of fish food?

Robbins: That’s full of fish food, so it’s kind of fun.

Billy Beck III: Take a bite of it! [LAUGHTER]

[They’re called EcoBioBalls. A Barcelona-based company started making them in 2010. The ball’s core is made of 100 percent natural fish food. The balls start to dissolve after 24 hours. Fish begin eating the food after 36 hours. The balls fully dissolve after 28 days. The balls passed independent tests for biodegradability and non-toxicity. A box of 100 balls costs $116. The balls don’t fly quite as far as normal golf balls, but that’s a small price to pay when you’re feeding fish!]

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Alabama Fast Food Chain Milo’s Rivals Shake Shack And In-N-Out Burger

While on a recent trip to my hometown of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, I paid a visit to an Alabama fast food institution: Milo’s Hamburgers. With 15 locations, Milo’s stands out as one of the unique fast food options available in the Yellowhammer state.

The restaurant’s signature burgers and fries are supplemented by a unique menu that includes chicken tenders, “fried pies,” a variety of original sauces, and sweet tea that is so beloved the company created a slushie version that’s beginning to roll out in Alabama convenience stores.

With an exclusively regional presence and a devoted cult following, Milo’s just might be worthy of being considered the In-N-Out Burger of the South. Following is a transcript of the video:

[We tried the “In-N-Out Burger” of Alabama]

[Tuscaloosa, Alabama]

[All 15 Milo’s locations are in Alabama]

[The chain is famous for its burgers, crinkle-cut fries, a variety of sauces, chicken tenders, “fried pies,” and its beloved sweet tea]

Milo’s Employee: Thank you, sir!

Graham Flanagan: Appreciate it!

This is really important — the sauces that you get. They’ve got five sauces, five original sauces. Too much sauce? I don’t think so.

I’m gonna start with the double cheeseburger. It’s caked in this Milo’s sauce, onions, pickles – it’s kind of got that vibe of like, a barbecue cheeseburger. So good! There’s something about that sauce with the burger.

Look at these fries. Beautiful. Crinkle-cut fries. Comparable to something you’d get at Shake Shack. Let’s try that with the sauces. You know, they call me the “Big Dipper.” Mix it up, baby!

This my cousin Jon.

Jon Tyler: Hello.

Flanagan: What makes Milo’s unique?

Tyler: The chicken.

Flanagan: Look at that! Man! You’re on chicken cam!

They also have what they call “fried pies.” I’m just gonna take a bite out of it like a Pop-Tart. That is so delicious. Flaky and sweet. Today is my cheat day.

Milo’s is famous for its sweet tea. People buy it by the gallon. It’s a phenomenon. Just to give you an idea of how popular Milo’s sweet tea is, there’s a gas station sort of on the outskirts of Tuscaloosa that sells a Milo’s slushie, but they call it a “Freezey.” And this is the only place you can get it. Wow. It’s already got lemon in it. It tastes like the tea, but it’s a slushie. This is like the greatest invention of all time!

I bet a lot of Alabamians would be ready to take this up against In-N-Out Burger any day. I think the rest of the nation would be in luck if they ever decided to expand.

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Driving with 1% battery on DAY 7 OF THE TESLA ROAD TRIP

Business Insider’s Will Wei and Graham Flanagan drove a Tesla Model X across the United States. Their goal? To get from San Francisco to New York City in just seven days by relying exclusively on Tesla’s nationwide network of Supercharger stations. Watch their seven-day journey as they drive a Tesla across America: http://read.bi/2vFvxfb

On the final day of the trip, things get nerve-wracking. Leaving Cleveland, the navigation system said Will and Graham would arrive at the next Supercharger station with only 2% battery power. That estimate quickly downgraded to 1%. This was most certainly caused by poor planning on their part.

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Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.