The State Of Unite The Right A Year After Charlottesville (HBO)

In the summer of 2017, the alt right was an internet movement, and its rally in Charlottesville was intended to prove they could operate in the real world. It proved the opposite. The marchers had promised there would be more to come — but that’s not what happened. ​
“There’s not big alt right demonstrations at present. And that is largely due to Charlottesville,” Chris Cantwell told VICE News, a year after the rally. Cantwell had been home about two weeks. He’d been charged with a felony for macing people in the 2017 torch march, and that kept him in Virginia for almost a year, either in jail or under GPS monitoring. In late July, he pled guilty to misdemeanor assault and battery, and was banished from the state for five years.

“There was a lot of violence, a lot of chaos, a lot of lawfare — guys went to prison over this. And that understandably caused a lot of people to reconsider whether they wanted to have anything to do with it,” Cantwell said of Charlottesville. “And there wasn’t a whole lot of agreement about how to go forward, and that, to put it charitably, left us fractured.”

The aftermath of the rally has put a crushing pressure on the alt right. It’s been booted from mainstream social media. Its leaders can’t raise much money online, because crowdfunding sites reject them, and companies that process credit card payments keep kicking them off. (Cantwell said he’s been kicked off four payment processors, and has applied and been rejected from nearly 100 more.) Marchers who showed their faces in Charlottesville were doxxed, and when their identities were posted online, many were fired.

Antifa are a menacing presence at nearly every white nationalist public event. The anti-fascists have been able to do that by infiltrating white nationalist communications networks.

Over the last year, VICE News followed several alt right figures as they tried to push the movement into the mainstream. Both Richard Spencer and Matthew Heimbach went out on college tours to reach out to young people, and ended up speaking to nearly empty rooms. Both quit soon after.

Cantwell lives alone, in an apartment with very dark curtains. His shelves are filled with protein powder and nutritional supplements, he has a room full of exercise equipment, and he’s taped up signs reminding him to “STOP SAYING FUCK” on the fridge and in the bathroom. His sole source of income is his racist content business. He wants the alt right to learn how to organize, meet each other in person, and keep secrets. “I try not to look at the world in terms of regrets or whatever. What I try to do is look at it in terms of lessons learned,” Cantwell said. “I learned that the alt right, for all this talk of order, is not all that orderly.”

Cantwell says that whatever the social cost of being a white nationalist, it’s worth it. The cause has given him purpose. “I already am celebrated by more people than most people are. I mean, I matter, right? Most people don’t matter,” he said. “Most people will go through the world mostly unnoticed, and they’re happy with that. I have more people who care about me than almost anybody else.”

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Touch screen technology

A touch screen enables users to interact directly with a display monitor. They have become a feature of everyday life at supermarket check-outs, ATM machines, on GPS devices and most commonly with tablets and smartphones.VIDEOGRAPHIC

Touch screen technology

A touch screen enables users to interact directly with a display monitor. They have become a feature of everyday life at supermarket check-outs, ATM machines, on GPS devices and most commonly with tablets and smartphones.VIDEOGRAPHIC

Touch screen technology

A touch screen enables users to interact directly with a display monitor. They have become a feature of everyday life at supermarket check-outs, ATM machines, on GPS devices and most commonly with tablets and smartphones.VIDEOGRAPHIC

Japan launches rocket with new ‘Michibiki’ GPS for security purposes

A rocket was launched from Tanegashima Space Centre early on Thursday morning as part of Japan’s efforts to construct its own global positioning system. The H-IIA 34 rocket was carrying a quasi-zenith satellite system named ‘Michibiki’, meaning ‘guidance’. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry plan to launch two more such satellites by next spring to complete Japan’s GPS. In Japan, users currently rely on location information provided by the US GPS. Once the system is completed, many hope to get much more precise location information.

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Drone Hunters: Anti-UAV rifle released in China

As China increases restrictions on unauthorised drone flights over public safety fears, Bei Dou Open Lab showcased their innovative counter drone technology to crack down illegal drone flights. The new anti-drone system is powered by smartphones and can be safely used at large, public gatherings. It tracks down drones with a simulated GPS signal and guides them safely to the ground.

Drone usage has increased due to the popularity of birds-eye view imagery. However, according to recent laws in China, all drone operators have to be certified.

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Cuffed Without Cause (Extra Scene from ‘Driving While Black’)

Watch the Full Length – http://bit.ly/1WDWBVr

A report from Seton Hall Law School Center for Policy & Research has found that in the majority-white municipality of Bloomfield, New Jersey, nearly 80 percent of traffic tickets are issued to African American and Latino drivers.

The report also found that most tickets were issued to non-resident minority drivers passing through town, suggesting a “de facto border patrol” policing policy is in effect.

The Bloomfield Police Department — which has begun collecting data on the race of drivers in traffic stops as of January 2016 — rejects the report’s findings.

Jason Castle is a councilman-at-large for the Township of Teaneck, New Jersey. In 2012, Castle was detained by New Jersey state troopers near Englewood after he pulled over to change the settings on his car’s GPS. His warrant stated that he had refused a breathalyzer test. Eight months later, Castle’s charges were dismissed when the state failed to supply evidence of an offense or provide him with a speedy trial. VICE News sat down with Castle to hear why he believes he was mistreated and denied his rights by law enforcement.

Read “Driving While Black: Cops Target Minority Drivers in This Mostly White New Jersey Town” – http://bit.ly/1QlaDDW

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VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – November 11, 2014

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The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines.​ Today: FARC members sentenced to prison for murder by Colombian indigenous court, Boko Haram suspected in suicide bomb attack on Nigerian high school, worrying spike in Sierra Leone’s Ebola cases, and Egyptian tour buses equipped with GPS units to encourage safe driving.

COLOMBIA
Indigenous Court Convicts FARC Members of Murders
Seven were sentenced over the shootings of two leaders of the Nasa tribe last week.

NIGERIA
Suicide Attack on Boys High School in Northeast
Suspected Boko Haram attack killed at least 46 and wounded 80 at a school in the town of Potsikum.

SIERRA LEONE
Sharp Rise in New Ebola Cases
Health officials recorded 111 new cases on Sunday, compared to 45 the day before. The UN has warned that the country’s cases are also grossly underreported.

EGYPT
GPS Units Seek to Make Tour Buses Safer
Officials monitor the buses’ movements to ensure drivers are traveling at safe speeds in a country with a notoriously poor road safety record.

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