Signs – Osaris [Red Light Records]

Signs = Opsen Music + Primal Therapy + Le lutin

Bash Around demonstrates the quality that you would associate with Red Light, coupled with a strong sense of the future, and an approach dripping with sci-fi influences. Harsh, sliding samples sit on top of a storming, modulated beat, as the bass slides up to you, giving it to you full in the face. Elements of Optiv, BTK and classic Bad Company are easy to spot, but Bash Around certainly has enough of the young French crew to make it different, an d unique. A strong but subtle take on the sound, this one is set to be a fixture in the clubs.

Flip side Osaris is equally as big, just in a different way. A dryer, more insistent drum set sits underneath this one, with moving effects and some big, big synths. Less straight-up than its predecessor, it’s still all hands to the pump when this one drops. Forceful, funky and unforgiving, Signs lay out what they can do, and believe us, they can do it well.

Buy it here : http://www.beatport.com/release/bash-around/1271651

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VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – May, 7 2014

The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Ukraine says troops from Russia and Crimea are fighting alongside separatists in the east of the country, Egyptian presidential candidate Abdel Fattah El-Sisi says the Egyptian people will ‘put an end’ to the Muslim Brotherhood if he is elected, Iran’s hardline Revolutionary Guard says it builds then sinks replica American warships for practice, and French forces release video of their battle with rebels in the Central African Republic.

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UKRAINE
Government Says Russia has Troops in Embattled East
Officials report casualties on both sides as fighting intensifies between government troops and separatists.

EGYPT
Sisi Says Egyptians Will ‘Put an End’ to the Muslim Brotherhood
The former army chief gives his first national television interview since announcing his run for presidential office.

IRAN
Replica U.S. Ships Built and Destroyed for Target Practice
Naval chief’s comments showcase how different the Revolutionary Guard’s tone is from the more moderate President Hassan Rouhani.

C.A.R.
French Army Releases Video Of Fierce Fighting
French forces engaged in an hours-long battle with rebels believed to have killed aid workers and civilians last month.

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VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – April 10, 2014.

The VICE News Capsule is a daily roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: more than 4,000 migrants have been rescued in two days off Italy’s southern coast, a suspected British drug smuggler was arrested in Thailand, anti-austerity protests in Greece and Belgium destroys tons of seized ivory.

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More Than 4000 Migrants Rescued in Two Days
The Italian government says that more than 4,000 migrants have been rescued off of the country’s southern coast over a period of 48 hours.

Suspected British Drug Smuggler Arrested
Thai police arrested a British national who the French police accuse of masterminding an international heroin and cocaine smuggling operation.

Anti-Austerity Protests
More than 20,000 people marched to the Greek parliament building in Athens in the latest protest against austerity measures being imposed on them by the country’s foreign creditors.

Belgium Destroys Tons of Seized Ivory
Belgian officials crushed one-point-seven tons of ivory seized at it’s borders.

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War in the Central African Republic (Full Length)

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The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

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War in the Central African Republic: Part 5/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

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Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 4/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 3/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 2/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 1/5 (Documentary)

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

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Crisis in the Central African Republic: Dispatch Seven

Watch “Crisis in the Central African Republic: Dispatch One” here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-9F3hbYpAE&list=PLDbSvEZka6GGHivZqJOTMcmvarhWauVBi&index=1

As the UN debates deploying thousands more peacekeepers to the Central African Republic, rights groups have warned that ethnic cleansing of Muslims is already well underway. Last week, after the French government voted to further keep troops in the country, CAR President Catherine Samba-Panza voiced her approval for the continuing French mission.

Shortly after, French President Francois Hollande visited to show support.

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