Europe’s Anti-Fascists Clash with Police in Vienna

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Right-wing nationalists of the Identitarian Movement held a rally in Vienna on May 17. Organizing themselves across social media, members of factions across Europe flooded in from France, Belgium, Italy, and Switzerland to join the Austrian faction to demonstrate against the EU.

To combat the protest, an anti-fascist group known as Offense Against the Right also gathered in the Austrian capital. As crowds became increasingly angry, police moved in to arrest protesters and separate the two opposing factions. VICE News was there to witness the clash of Europe’s new generation of extreme political movements.

Meet the EU’s New Breed of Bigoted Parliament Members: https://news.vice.com/article/meet-the-eus-new-breed-of-bigoted-parliament-members

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – May, 29 2014

The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: French riot police clear makeshift migrant camps to contain a scabies outbreak, Lebanese soldiers use violence to control a crowd of Syrians rushing to vote at their embassy, Congolese children are flown to reunite with their adoptive Italian parents after a months-long political row, and Google rolls out a new driverless car prototype.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

FRANCE
Police Bulldoze Migrant Camps Due to ‘Deplorable Hygiene’
A scabies outbreak forces authorities to clear hundreds of migrants from makeshift camps in the port city of Calais.

LEBANON
Soldiers Violently Confront Syrians Trying to Rush Embassy
Troops used batons and sticks as hordes of Syrians forced their way in to cast their ballots in the presidential vote.

ITALY
Congolese Children Reunited With Adoptive Families
It took months to convince the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo the children would not be sold into human trafficking rings.

U.S.A.
Google Unveils Another Driverless Car
The prototype has no gas or brake pedals and no steering wheel, freeing the two passengers inside from any responsibility.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – April 7, 2014.

The VICE News Capsule is a daily roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: intense fighting around Damascus, France is accused of direct involvement in the Rwandan genocide, the Hungarian prime minister claims victory in parliamentary elections and scientists have developed a new belt that protects the body from radiation.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Intense Fighting Around Damascus
The Syrian military has launched a deadly offensive on rebel-controlled areas in the outskirts of the capital, Damascus. Rebels responded with mortar fire on government locations, and dozens people have been reported killed.

France Accused of Direct Involvement in Genocide
Rwandan president, and one time rebel leader Paul Kagame accused France of playing a direct role in the genocide that killed more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsis in 1994.

Prime Minister Claims Victory in Parliamentary Election
Hungarian prime minister Victor Orban has declared victory in parliamentary elections after polls showed his center-right Fidesz party has won 45% of votes with most of the ballots counted.

New Belt Protects Body From Radiation
Three Israeli Nobel Prize laureates have developed and anti-radiation belt designed to protect first responders to nuclear disasters.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – March 26, 2014.

The VICE News Capsule is a daily roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: France’s far right party, Russia’s space program, Taliban attacks in Afghanistan and Syria’s space program.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

France’s Far Right Party Wins A Socialist Stronghold
France’s anti-immigrant National Front party just won an election in Henin-Beaumont — an industrial town that used to be a stronghold of the Socialist party.

Sanctions Impacting Russia’s Space Program
The recent tensions between Moscow and Washington could hinder the US-Russian Space collaboration, affecting NASA’s future role in Space. Read the article on VICE News: https://news.vice.com/articles/how-to-screw-your-partner-in-space

Attacks Highlight Afghanistan’s Fragile Security
The Taliban killed at least six people and left dozens wounded in three separate attacks in Afghanistan, just 10 days before the general elections are set to take place. Read the Article on VICE News: https://news.vice.com/articles/taliban-intensifies-attacks-ahead-of-afghan-election

Syrian Government Announces Space Agency
In spite of a civil war that has torn its country apart for more than three years, the Syrian government has announced plans to start its own Space agency.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

War in the Central African Republic (Full Length)

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

War in the Central African Republic: Part 5/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

War in the Central African Republic: Part 4/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

War in the Central African Republic: Part 3/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

War in the Central African Republic: Part 2/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

War in the Central African Republic: Part 1/5 (Documentary)

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/