Ethiopian border towns react warily to Prime Minister Abiy’s Nobel | AFP

For many Ethiopans that live close to the country’s border with Eritrea, the news that Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed had been awarded the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize has been greeted with skepticism. Some say they have failed to see concrete improvements to the tense situation along the border, with reports of Ethiopians being detained by Eritrean soldiers.

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Ethiopians react to PM Abiy Ahmed’s Nobel Peace Prize win | AFP

Ethiopians in Addis Ababa react to the news that the country’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has been awarded the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize. The Nobel Committee said they selected Ahmed “for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea.”

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PROFILE – Abiy Ahmed, Ethiopian Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize recipient | AFP

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has been awarded the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to resolve his country’s conflict with bitter foe Eritrea.

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Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed wins Nobel Peace Prize | AFP

The Chair of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, announces that the Nobel Peace Prize 2019 goes to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali “for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation”, and “his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea”. SOUNDBITE

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France’s Macron meets with Ethiopia’s reformist PM Abiy

French President Emmanuel Macron welcomes Ethiopia’s reformist Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed at the Elysee palace. Since taking office in April, the 42-year-old has pushed reforms ranging from the privatisation of key state-owned sectors to a peace deal that ended the conflict with neighbour Eritrea. IMAGES

Ethiopia hopes Eritrea peace will bring prosperity

Eighteen years after the guns fell silent following Ethiopia’s bloody border war with Eritrea, the frontier town of Zalambessa is a quiet, rubble-strewn outpost crossed by a road to nowhere. But change could be on the horizon after the leaders of Ethiopia and Eritrea agreed to reestablish relations, raising hopes that trade will resume and towns like Zalambessa will roar again.

AP Top Stories July 14 P

Here’s the latest for Saturday July 14th: President Trump spends a private weekend in Scotland; Israeli military carry out airstrikes against Hamas; Eritrea’s president visits Ethiopia; French police motorcycles crash in Bastille Day parade. (July 14)

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Blackout Ep. 4: Leaks from Eritrea, Africa’s North Korea

Eritrea is the most censored country in the world, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists and Reporters Sans Frontières. Often referred to as Africa’s North Korea, the Eritrean government controls the flow of information with vigilance, restricting any dissenting voices from reaching the people.

As a result, Eritrean activists are forced to get creative. Through pirate radio, cold calls, messages on banknotes and posters put up in the dead of night, dissidents find ways to generate the only resistance they can.

VICE News follows members of the Eritrean diaspora community in Europe as they run radio stations, maintain online opposition sites and help to organize those still in Eritrea.

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Sudan boosts border patrols to curb people smuggling

In a bid to flee Eritrea and later make it to Europe, a group of migrants were abducted by Sudanese Bedouin Rashaida tribesmen after they illegally crossed into east Sudan. Sudanese security forces, who have stepped up their patrols along the 600-kilometre (370-mile) frontier with Eritrea in a bid to curb migrant smuggling, freed the group.

Desperation in Desert Refugee Camp (Excerpt from ‘Escape From Yemen’)

According to UN estimates, nearly 100,000 people have fled Yemen since violence erupted there in March. Of those escaping the conflict, over 20,000 have sought refuge in the tiny East African nation of Djibouti, an authoritarian state located between Eritrea and Somalia seen as a beacon of stability in the region, largely due to its hosting of a US military base.

The Markazi refugee camp, located in the arid and dusty Obock region, plays host to many of those fleeing Yemen. Refugees can live in the tented camp, where the average June temperature varied between 111 and 122 degrees Fahrenheit (44 – 50 degrees Celsius). Otherwise they can pay cripplingly high rental costs for substandard living conditions in Djibouti City.

In this excerpt from ‘Escape From Yemen,’ VICE News meets refugees that have sought shelter in a camp in a desert in Djibouti, where harsh living conditions are a daily reality.

Watch “Seeking Refuge in Djibouti: Escape From Yemen” – http://bit.ly/1JeKpRc

Read “Saudi-led Assault on Yemeni City Kills Dozens of Civilians, Raising Questions About US Role” – http://bit.ly/1JfrIPH

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Seeking Refuge in Djibouti: Escape From Yemen

According to UN estimates, nearly 100,000 people have fled Yemen since violence erupted there in March. Of those escaping the conflict, over 20,000 have sought refuge in the tiny East African nation of Djibouti, an authoritarian state located between Eritrea and Somalia seen as a beacon of stability in the region, largely due to its hosting of a US military base.

The Markazi refugee camp, located in the arid and dusty Obock region, plays host to many of those fleeing Yemen. Refugees can live in the tented camp, where the average June temperature varied between 111 and 122 degrees Fahrenheit (44 – 50 degrees Celsius). Otherwise they can pay cripplingly high rental costs for substandard living conditions in Djibouti City.

Following on from our coverage of the conflict in Aden, VICE News travels to Djibouti to discover the effects of the war on those forced to flee their homes and start anew.

Watch “The Siege of Aden” – http://bit.ly/1Dxmq2y

Read “Under Fire: Inside the Siege of Aden” – http://bit.ly/1Wi2IhB

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Escape From Yemen (Trailer)

According to UN estimates, nearly 100,000 people have fled Yemen since violence erupted there in March. Of those escaping the conflict, over 20,000 have sought refuge in the tiny East African nation of Djibouti, an authoritarian state located between Eritrea and Somalia seen as a beacon of stability in the region, largely due to its hosting of a US military base.

The Markazi refugee camp, located in the arid and dusty Obock region, plays host to many of those fleeing Yemen. Refugees can live in the tented camp, where the average June temperature varied between 111 and 122 degrees Fahrenheit (44 – 50 degrees Celsius). Otherwise they can pay cripplingly high rental costs for substandard living conditions in Djibouti City.

Following on from our coverage of the conflict in Aden, VICE News travels to Djibouti to discover the effects of the war on those forced to flee their homes and start anew.

Watch “The Siege of Aden” – http://bit.ly/1Dxmq2y

Read “As Yemenis Starve, Saudi Arabia is Accused of War Crimes in the Country” – http://bit.ly/1OTHsZY

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VICE News Capsule: South Korea Braces for MERS Outbreak

The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: South Koreans are avoiding public gatherings due to fears of a MERS outbreak, a UN report slammed Eritrea’s human rights record, Beirut’s last public beach space is being threatened by a new resort development, and Myanmar returned 150 Bangladeshi migrants intercepted at sea last month.

SOUTH KOREA
Sixth Death Reported in MERS Outbreak
A sixth patient has died and 80 confirmed cases make South Korea’s MERS outbreak the largest outside the Middle East.

ERITREA
UN Report Slams Human Rights Record
A new UN report says Eritrea may have committed crimes against humanity and calls out its mandatory conscription service.

LEBANON
New Resort Threatens Livelihoods and Beach Access
A new resort development is threatening access to the last bit of public beach in Beirut.

MYANMAR
Bangladeshi Migrants Repatriated After Boat Rescue
Myanmar returned 150 migrants back to Bangladesh who were intercepted in a boat on their way to Malaysia last month.

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Overcrowding and Hostility Towards Migrants: Fortress Italia (Part 2/4)

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On October 3, 2013, over 360 migrants drowned in the Mediterranean Sea after their boat capsized near the island of Lampedusa. The geographical proximity of Lampedusa to the north coast of Africa has caused it to become one of Europe’s gateways for migrants, who each week arrive in Italy by sea in droves.

The majority of the migrants are fleeing war in Syria and Eritrea’s repressive regime in search of a better life. But unscrupulous traffickers and unsafe vessels often lead to many not surviving the journey. And under current European immigration laws, those who succeed in reaching Italian shores often end up stuck there.

In the first half of 2014, over 63,000 migrants arrived at Italy’s shores. Of those attempting to make the deadly journey to Europe, over 3,000 migrants have drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean, according to the International Organization for Migration.

VICE News headed to Lampedusa one year after the disaster and visited the centers that house large numbers of migrants in overcrowded and makeshift living conditions.

Watch Part 1: http://bit.ly/Italia-1

Read: Thousands of Eritreans Face Torture and Death as They Flee Despotic Rule – http://bit.ly/1nYERFJ

Watch dispatches from Immigrant America: http://bit.ly/1nYEStk

Click to watch “Berlin’s Refugee Crisis” – http://bit.ly/1CSunec

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Capsized in Lampedusa: Fortress Italia (Part 1/4)

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On October 3, 2013, over 360 migrants drowned in the Mediterranean Sea after their boat capsized near the island of Lampedusa. The geographical proximity of Lampedusa to the north coast of Africa has caused it to become one of Europe’s gateways for migrants, who each week arrive in Italy by sea in droves.

The majority of the migrants are fleeing war in Syria and Eritrea’s repressive regime in search of a better life. But unscrupulous traffickers and unsafe vessels often lead to many not surviving the journey. And under current European immigration laws, those who succeed in reaching Italian shores often end up stuck there.

In the first half of 2014, over 63,000 migrants arrived at Italy’s shores. Of those attempting to make the deadly journey to Europe, over 3,000 migrants have drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean, according to the International Organization for Migration. Following the October 2013 tragedy, and amid pressure from the international community, Italy vowed to put some measures in place to help control the problem, and save lives.

VICE News headed to Lampedusa one year after the disaster to find out how Italy’s new sea rescue mission, Mare-Nostrum, along with regulations such as the Dublin Treaty, are affecting the influx of migrants.

Watch Part 2: http://bit.ly/1sci3lA

Read: Thousands of Eritreans Face Torture and Death as They Flee Despotic Rule – http://bit.ly/1nYERFJ

Watch dispatches from Immigrant America: http://bit.ly/1nYEStk

Click to watch “Berlin’s Refugee Crisis” – http://bit.ly/1CSunec

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VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – September 23, 2014

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The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Hong Kong students boycott classes to demand electoral reform, Islamic State lifts ban on cigarettes in Iraq’s Kirkuk province, Israeli court orders migrant detention center to shut down, and Rockefeller family to sell oil assets to invest in clean energy.

HONG KONG
Students Start Week-Long Protest for Electoral Reform​
Thousands rallied in the city on Monday to demand universal suffrage.

IRAQ
Islamic State Lifts Cigarette Ban in Kirkuk
Militant group has reportedly allowed smoking to increase its popularity among residents.

ISRAEL
Court Orders Shutdown of Migrant Detention Center
Authorities have three months to release some 2,000 African migrants, who are mainly from Sudan and Eritrea.

U.S.A.
Rockefeller Family Pledges to Sell Oil Assets
Family fund joins hundreds of philanthropists to divest more than $50 billion from fossil fuels for reinvestment in clean energy.

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Migrant Crisis in Calais: Britain’s Border War (Dispatch 1)

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Refugees from Afghanistan, Syria, Sudan, and Eritrea steadily descend on a migrant camp in the French coastal town of Calais. They hope to gain entry to the UK, just 21 miles away across the English Channel. But in May, French police destroyed their camp and told the migrants to go elsewhere. And so they moved… across the street. With the few tents and blankets they’re able to salvage, the refugees formed the Salam camp, which now holds about 400 people.

Every night, the migrants — many of whom have been forced to flee war and conflict in their home countries — attempt to sneak aboard trucks headed for Britain; eight migrants have already died this year while trying to make the journey. Inside Salam, things have gotten so bad that some occupants are hunger striking in an attempt to draw attention to their plight. But the French authorities do little to help, while the UK government turns a blind eye.

VICE News spent time in the Salam camp to find out why hundreds of displaced people are being allowed to live in squalor — and even die.

Watch Dispatch 2: http://bit.ly/1s3YGwI

Migrants in France Are Threatening to Set Themselves on Fire: http://bit.ly/1lAhydl

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