Beto O’Rourke talks evolution on guns

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke says he came to support a mandatory buyback program for assault weapons after speaking to mass shooting survivors in El Paso. (Oct. 2)

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Gabby Giffords speaks to Texas town hall on guns

Former U.S. congresswoman and shooting survivor Gabby Giffords briefly spoke at a town hall meeting in El Paso, Texas on Thursday night. (Aug. 23)

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Vietnam veteran drives from New Mexico to El Paso to pay his respects

Glen Blasdel, 83, standing alone, was one of the first people standing in line on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, to pay respects to Margie Reckard, 63, who was killed by a gunman who opened fire at a Walmart in El Paso, Tex., earlier this month.

San Angelo, Texas man explains why he made the trip to El Paso

Thousands of strangers from Los Angeles to Tucson came to El Paso, Texas, to say goodbye to an El Paso shooting victim after hearing her long-time companion had few family members left. Jordan Ballard, 38, of Los Angeles, explains why she made the trek to El Paso. Jerry Brown, 58, of San Angelo, Texas talks about why he made the trip to El Paso to attend a service for Margie Reckard, who was killed in a mass shooting earlier in the month. (Aug. 17)

Los Angeles woman explains why she traveled to El Paso

Thousands of strangers from Los Angeles to Tucson came to El Paso, Texas, to say goodbye to an El Paso shooting victim after hearing her long-time companion had few family members left. Jordan Ballard, 38, of Los Angeles, explains why she made the trek to El Paso.

Strangers mourn for El Paso shooting victim

When 63-year-old Margie Reckard was killed by a gunman who opened fire at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, earlier this month, Antonio Basco lost his entire world. So, he he invited the world to join him in remembering his companion of 22 years. (Aug. 16)

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Americans Told Us How Their Lives Have Been Torn Apart By Gun Violence

As the U.S. was still reeling from back-to-back mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, we started asking Americans from different generations and walks of life how gun violence in the country has impacted them personally.

Then, on Wednesday night, an armed man shot six police officers in north Philadelphia during an eight-hour standoff.

“When Columbine happened, I felt like ‘What’s going to happen now? Are they going to change the gun laws?’ But nothing happened. Then Sandy Hook happened and I thought ‘Now they’re really going to do something about it’ and nothing happened,” Diana Torres, 42, said. “At this point, I feel like what else has to happen for this to change?”

America’s rate of murder or manslaughter by firearm is the highest in the developed world.

“It’s really been normalized that gun violence is a part of my everyday life,” said Jolie Simone Barga, 14. “We don’t feel safe at school. We don’t feel safe going to the movie theater. We don’t go and feel safe at a store.”

Every day, 100 Americans are killed with guns, and hundreds more are injured, according to Everytown research. Families, friends, colleagues, and communities are left with the loss of loved ones and with persistent fear about the next mass shooting.

“This isn’t just a problem that happened in El Paso or a problem that happened in Dayton, Ohio. It can happen anywhere,” Barga said. “Just because it was in those places the other day, [doesn’t mean] that it can be in your hometown the next.”
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El Paso unites to remember mass shooting victims | AFP

The grieving US community of El Paso came together Wednesday night, standing up to the hatred that took the lives of 22 people, many of them Hispanic, in a mass shooting.

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