Kenya launches Africa’s biggest wind farm | AFP

Kenya formally launches Africa’s biggest wind power plant, a mammoth project in a gusty stretch of wilderness that already provides nearly a fifth of the country’s energy needs. The $680-million (600 million euro) scheme, a sprawling 365-turbine wind farm on the eastern shores of Lake Turkana, is delivering 310 megawatts of renewable power to the national grid of East Africa’s most dynamic economy.

Abonnez-vous à la chaîne de l’AFP, et pensez à activer les notifications 🔔
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCckz6n8QccTd6K_xdwKqa0A/?sub_confirmation=1

Kenya court blocks East Africa’s first coal plant | AFP

Kenya’s environment court blocked Wednesday the construction of a coal power station in the Lamu archipelago, a $2 billion project that faced years of resistance from conservationists and local communities. SOUNDBITE

Abonnez-vous à la chaîne de l’AFP, et pensez à activer les notifications 🔔
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCckz6n8QccTd6K_xdwKqa0A/?sub_confirmation=1

S. Sudan parties meet in Ethiopia in bid to salvage peace deal

South Sudan’s warring parties meet in Addis Ababa in a bid to salvage a stalled peace deal with just days to go until a unity government is meant to be formed. The meeting has been arranged by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), a regional bloc for East Africa, which says it hopes the discussions will “develop a clear roadmap” for the formation of the government. IMAGES of the attendees

France’s Macron arrives in Djibouti for East Africa visit

French President Emmanuel Macron lands at Djibouti airport, where he is welcomed by his Djiboutian counterpart Ismaïl Omar Guelleh, as he kicks off a four-day East Africa visit. IMAGES

Cannes: Banned film ‘Rafiki’ targets homophobia in east Africa

A Kenyan-made film on lesbian love premieres at the Cannes festival on Wednesday — but at home, the movie has been banned, a decision exposing the often bitter debate over homosexuality in East Africa. For director Wanuri Kahiu, ‘Rafiki’ was first and foremost a film depicting Africa as being ‘fun’, ‘joyous’ and ‘full of hope’.

VICE News Daily: Saving America’s Honeybees

The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Thousands continue to flee the unrest in Burundi, Pakistan investigates an IT firm for allegedly selling fake academic degrees, gang violence surges in El Salvador, and the White House reveals its plan to save America’s honeybees.

EAST AFRICA
Thousands Continue to Flee Burundi Unrest
Residents feared violence and intimidation from pro-government militias and have sought refuge in neighboring countries.

PAKISTAN
Software Company Accused of Selling Fake Degrees
Federal authorities raided the offices of Axact and detained at least 24 people for questioning.

EL SALVADOR
Gang Violence on a Worrying Climb
The Central American nation’s homicide rate is the highest in a decade.

U.S.A.
Government Unveils Plan to Save Dwindling Honeybee Population
The White House strategy involves funding for education and research, as well as preservation of millions of acres in habitat for insects that are critical to agricultural production.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos

Albino Murders in Tanzania (Excerpt from ‘VICE News Meets Josephat Torner’)

A string of murders that began in 2000 has now left more than 72 albinos in Tanzania dead. These killings are believed to be motivated by the lucrative trade in albino body parts, which some Africans believe possess magical powers.

Tanzania has now been listed by the United Nations as the African nation where albinos are targeted for murder the most. According to long-standing traditions in the country, albinos are believed to be ghosts who are cursed, but whose body parts can ward off bad luck, and bring the owner wealth and success. In response to these killings, in January 2015 Tanzania banned witch doctors.

In East Africa, one child in 3,000 is born albino, compared to one in 20,000 in the United States. In Tanzania, albino advocacy groups estimate the number of albinos to be somewhere above 100,000 in a population of nearly 50 million people.

VICE News traveled to Tanzania to meet with Josephat Torner, an albino activist who has dedicated his life to raising awareness and acceptance towards albinos in his country, while debunking the widespread myths and superstitions surrounding the congenital disorder.

In this excerpt, Josephat talks about the witchdoctor-motivated albino killings and discusses instances where family members have facilitated these murders.

Watch “VICE News Meets Jospehat Torner” – http://bit.ly/1FzTiUi

Read “Another Albino Child Is Murdered and Mutilated in Tanzania” – http://bit.ly/1AP72tr

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos

Albino Activism in Tanzania: VICE News Meets Josephat Torner

A string of murders that began in 2000 has now left more than 72 albinos in Tanzania dead. These killings are believed to be motivated by the lucrative trade in albino body parts, which some Africans believe possess magical powers.

Tanzania has now been listed by the United Nations as the African nation where albinos are targeted for murder the most. According to long-standing traditions in the country, albinos are believed to be ghosts who are cursed, but whose body parts can ward off bad luck, and bring the owner wealth and success. In response to these killings, in January 2015 Tanzania banned witch doctors.

In East Africa, one child in 3,000 is born albino, compared to one in 20,000 in the United States. In Tanzania, albino advocacy groups estimate the number of albinos to be somewhere above 100,000 in a population of nearly 50 million people.

VICE News traveled to Tanzania to meet with Josephat Torner, an albino activist who has dedicated his life to raising awareness and acceptance towards albinos in his country, while debunking the widespread myths and superstitions surrounding the congenital disorder.

Watch “Europe or Die: Storming Spain’s Razor-Wire Fence” – http://bit.ly/1FoHUxO

Read: “Fueled by Superstition, People Are Violently Attacking Albinos in Tanzania” – http://bit.ly/1FoGFyR

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos