California After The Deadly Wildfire | VICE on HBO

California is experiencing its worst wildfire season in a decade, and November’s Camp Fire was the deadliest, most destructive fire in the state’s recorded history. While climate change is partially to blame, and its effects becoming more severe according to a new government report, there might be another culprit at play. Gianna Toboni travels to the scorched town of Paradise to learn how California can survive a future of deadlier fires.

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One month after Camp Fire residents return to devastated city

“The way the fire moved, it’s just really strange…” A month after the Camp Fire, which killed at least 85 people, Scott Harris and dozens of residents of the bereaved city of Paradise are coming to terms with the new face of their city. More than 90% of it was destroyed, and the evacuation order has finally just been lifted in some districts. Many people are continuing to search the rubble of their homes for remains of objects. For the few residents whose homes are intact, such as Judy Welles, returning to her devastated neighborhood is not necessarily any easier to manage.

Inside The Search For Nearly 1,000 People Missing From The California Wildfire (HBO)

CHICO, California — As the Camp Fire continues to burn, 12 days later, and at 66 percent containment, 77 deaths have been confirmed, and 993 are left unaccounted for.

With over 151,000 acres burned, the search for the unaccounted is unprecedented.

“We don’t normally have a process to deal with this many unaccounted for individuals,” Butte County Sheriff and Coroner Kory Honea told VICE News. But the list has posed several challenges for authorities trying to track everyone down. Issues range from: People not knowing they are on the list, duplicated names due to converged data sets, to even finding remains in all the debris.

While the list of unaccounted people represents an imperfect picture of the missing, it does illustrate the large retirement community in the area. Paradise, the city hardest hit by the fires, was known, in part, as a retirement community, a quiet place for people to get away.

VICE News spent time with Tammie Konicki, during her search for her missing 64-year-old mother, who was last seen getting into a car the morning of the fire.

“Hopefully she is somewhere and just doesn’t have a way to get a hold of us,” Konicki said of her mother. “Right now, for me, no news is good news, because no news means she hasn’t been found dead,” she said. “She’s not one of those bodies as of yet.”

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Inside The Town Devastated By The Deadliest Wildfire In California’s History (HBO)

Never. Never, had they seen anything like it. Never, did they think it could get to this. Never, did the residents of Paradise, CA think a fire would actually swallow their community whole.

“It was just like in the movies,” said 81 year-old Paradise resident, Bobbie Covington. “I was stuck in a line of traffic and cars were blowing up around me from the heat.”

The Camp Fire, which was at 35% containment as of Wednesday night, is on record as the most deadly and destructive fire in California’s history, having killed 56 people and destroying 8,817 structures, as of Wednesday evening.

“I called my son and said, ‘I love you, I’m not going to make it out of this,” said Covington, who lost her home of 45 years to the flames.

While investigators are still looking into what started the Camp Fire, a coalition of lawyers filed a lawsuit Tuesday, accusing PG&E of negligence for how they handled the power lines when conditions worsened.

“If they cut the power off the night before, this wouldn’t have happened,” said Paradise resident Cindy Heike, 59, who lost one of her properties.

PG&E, which expects to pay about $2.5 billion for its role and the losses in 14 wildfires last year, said they, “will fully cooperate with any investigations.”

Meanwhile, fire crews continue to work on putting an end to the Camp Fire and residents are left coming to terms with what was unimaginable.

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California: thousands displaced in the wake of the “Camp Fire”

The “Camp Fire,” California’s worst ever wildfire, has killed at least 29 people and destroyed 6000 buildings, mainly residences. The victims have been evacuated and have not yet been allowed to return to the scene.

Wildfires rage in California

Fierce wildfires rage across the western US state of California. The fast-moving Camp Fire has been fanned by strong winds to scorch 70,000 acres (28,300 hectares) and has not been contained, the California Fire Department (Cal Fire) said.