Why Accountants Quit Their Jobs To Teach Arts And Crafts

Sam and Diana used to work for accountancy firms KPMG and EY before deciding to open an arts and craft shop in London. Their creative space is called M.Y.O. (Make Your Own) and they run several workshops including ceramic painting, pottery, and calligraphy.

Sam and Diana are now full-time in the business and list their activities on events platform Funzing.

See more from M.Y.O. (Make Your Own): https://www.myo.place/
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We Went Inside A Secret, Immersive Blade Runner Event

Secret Cinema is celebrating its 10-year anniversary with its biggest ever theatrical event. It has recreated the dystopian world of Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner in an East London warehouse.

Business Insider UK was among the first to be allowed to film inside the cult theatrical show.

Secret Cinema has shows running until July 8, 2018 and tickets cost between £45 and £110.

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Why Giving Advice To Friends Is Easier Than To Ourselves

Adam Grant is a professor at Wharton and author of “Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success” and “Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World.” He explains why we are more likely to give better advice to our friends than to ourselves. Grant also outlines the shortcuts we use to make better and faster decisions and how they sometimes backfire.

Watch Adam Grant and Business Insider’s Sara Silverstein in “Why Are We All So Stupid?” on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whyareweallsostupid/

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Following is a transcript of the video:

Adam Grant: Have you ever given advice to a friend where you just felt like, “I just gave the best advice ever,” and then you found yourself in the same situation a few days later, and you made a horrible decision?

Sara Silverstein: Absolutely, I do it all the time. I’m a very good advice giver, very bad life-decision maker.

Grant: Yeah, what’s that about? Because they’re the same skills, right? Giving people advice on what to do and then making your own decisions. It’s the exact same thing. Except it’s not. It’s called Solomon’s Paradox.

Solomon’s paradox: we can see solutions to other people’s problems more clearly than our own

Grant: And the idea is that when you give other people advice, you look at the problem through a telescope, and you see the big picture, you focus on the two or three criteria that are really important. Whereas when you’re making your own decisions, you tend to look at it through a microscope, which is how we end up with these Excel spreadsheets that have 19 different columns, and then you’re adjusting the weights, how important is each factor in order to get the decision that you want.

And I think that this illustrates: it’s one thing to know what a good decision is; it’s another thing to be able to make that decision yourself. And because it’s so difficult, if you were to actually sit down and analyze every decision in your life, you could spend hours deciding, “Well, what time should I wake up? Should I wake up at 6:01 or 6:02? I mean, my whole life could be different because of that. What should I order to eat? Who should I call first this morning? Which way should I take to work?” These decisions, we could spend all day just making these potentially paralyzing decisions. We don’t want to do that. We don’t want to waste our time. So what we do is we develop what are called heuristics, which are sort of mental shortcuts.

Heuristics: mental shortcuts that help us make decisions but can be flawed and lead to cognitive bias

Grant: If I can say to myself, “Well, experts are usually correct.” I don’t have to analyze a bunch of decisions where there’s already expert opinion. And a lot of times those heuristics make us smart, and they make us much more efficient decision makers. The problem is we overapply them. And so we might end up in a situation where the heuristic was good the last nine times we tried it, but you know what, now the expert is wrong, and we haven’t really stopped to think about whether we can trust that expert in that situation.

$700B Investor Says Long-Term Rates Aren’t Going Much Higher

Robert Tipp is the chief investment strategist of PGIM Fixed Income, the $709 billion global fixed income asset manager within Prudential Financial. He expects the long end of the yield curve to stay low even as the Fed continues to hike rates. In this interview with Business Insider’s Sara Silverstein, Tipp explains why this will happen and the impact it will have on investors’ portfolios.

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Life Painting Class Uses Neon Paint To Colorful Art

Neon naked life drawing uses UV light to regular naked life drawing classes to life. Models use UV reactive props to add the to interactive, weird neon experience. Neon-colored crayons and pens are also provided so participants can draw in a variety of techniques, from pointillism to Pop Art.

See more from Neon Naked: https://www.facebook.com/neonlifedrawingclass/

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7 Ways The World Is Getting Better

This year, Harvard professor Steven Pinker topped Bill Gates’s top book list with Enlightenment Now, a book that challenges people’s questions about world progress. 

According to Pinker, the world is actually getting better. In his book, Pinker uses history and statistics to outline world trends which position progress within a broader context. With all of the data Pinker has collected, he suggests the world is actually getting better.

See more from “Enlightenment Now”: https://www.amazon.com/Enlightenment-Now-Science-Humanism-Progress/dp/0525427570

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Inside The Tricked Out World Of Japanese “Dekotora” Trucks

Japanese Dekotora trucks are works of art, literally, as the word “dekotora” means decorated. Trucks are furbished with wall fabrics, chandeliers, and even full rooms. At the height of the movement, these deko-trucks were used for actual work, despite their exorbitant price tag that could go up to $100,000.

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How To Land The Interview And Nail It

With such a competitive job market, landing the job offer is getting increasingly harder. Dave Carvajal, author of “Hire Smart From The Start”, explains how to set yourself apart from the competition. Following is a transcript of the video. 

Dave Carvajal: In a world where people are getting increasingly marketed to more and more, it’s important to be
able to make your point succinctly and effectively.

Carvajal: The biggest mistake that people make when it comes to writing a resume is, first of all, writing a resume. Oftentimes they will write a resume like a list of technical achievements, and so the resume will actually look like
a technical manual. Instead, they should be writing their resume like a marketing brochure. A list of benefits to the buyer. Think about the greatest value-creating experiences, the experiences they might have had working on a team and to use, not only action words, but use success-action words; active words. For example, ‘driving,’ ‘growing,’ ‘leading,’ are very positive, affirmative action words.

Carvajal: The best advice on cover letters is have them be short and to the point. Understand what the buyer is looking for. Have your cover letter be specifically targeted to the individual reader, and speak to them in their language. Use their words; use their values.

Carvajal: As an interviewee, it’s very important to make sure that you do research in advance so that you truly understand what are the core values of the organization, what is the culture, what are the things that they celebrate and promote, and really do the best that you can to understand and communicate the overlap between your own personal values, and the values of the organization. One of the best things that you can do in preparing for your interview, is making sure that you not only research the core values of the organization, but also research the growth of the organization and where they’re headed, where the puck is going in the marketplace, in the industry, for that business. Be able to communicate the decisions that you’ve made in your career, the values that you bring to the organization, and how certain experiences might make you uniquely qualified to help the organization grow and move into a direction that it’s looking to go into.

Carvajal:  Oftentimes, we spend too much time in the English language focused on the transactional exchange of words, when, rather, we should be communicating at a deeper level the core values and the beliefs that we have. Technical chops are only responsible for about 20% of the reason why someone will succeed or fail at any given company. More than 60% of the reason why anyone will succeed or fail at any company has everything
to do with whether their personal DNA matches the cultural DNA of the organization.

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What Can Rescue Stocks From A Trade War Disaster

US stock valuations are at historically high levels by most measures. According to Jurrien Timmer, director of global macro for Fidelity Investments, the possibility of higher trade tariffs could put pressure on valuations. Timmer writes, “Historically, tariffs levied on trade have been inflationary, and we know that there is a consistent inverse relationship between P/E ratios and inflation.”

Of course, when valuations compress, stock prices generally go down. Stock price is the numerator in a P/E ratio, so the relationship is baked in. Even though the correlation is strong, there are times when the total return on stocks has been positive, even as the valuation multiple declined. In fact, according to Fidelity’s analysis, this has happened 22% of the time over the past 100 years. Though, these periods, which he refers to as “benign valuation-compression regimes” require strong earnings growth.

Read the full note here: https://bit.ly/2GWl2eb

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Why North Korea Agreed To Meet With Trump

Ji Seong-ho is a North Korean defector currently residing in South Korea. He now runs an organization ‘NAUH’ helping other North Koreans escape. Here’s why he thinks North Korea suddenly agreed to a meeting with Trump.

Below is the following transcript:

Ji Seong-ho: North Korea is simply trying to buy more time. They aren’t willing to give up their nuclear program but are growing weary of the joint military exercises and the anger of the American public and its government. The same goes for Trump’s government. To ensure the security of the nation, negotiating with North Korea concerning their nuclear program and disarming this threat is their highest priority. And it’s come to ap oint where they feel the need to take real action against North Korea.

And this is troubling new for North Korea and they are quite scared as well. In reality, if you take a look at North Korea, it’s the government that’s afraid of staring a war, not the people. The people can survive through wars but the North Korean government survives by exploiting its people and bullying other countries. It’s a good life for them but starting a war would endanger all of that, not to mention their lives. Although North Korea likes to brag about their successful missile launches and nuclear tests, they still need more time to complete their program. I think this meeting is to buy that very time.

Also Kim Jong-Un is being pressured to make a move as the public sentiment towards him is very bad. Kim Jong-Un promised his people a paradise to live in in just five years. His father said the same thing and so did his father before him. The people were unsure whether he could be trusted but gave him a chance nonetheless. In the end, Kim Jong-Un couldn’t keep his promise. On top of that, the trade sanctions have increased the living costs and made the lives harder for the people. To these people who are used to surviving without aid from their government, they can’t understand its obsession with the nuclear program.

And Kim Jong-Un has to resolve this by making a cooperative gesture towards the world. Last year, after their sixth successful test, they declared themselves a nuclear power and promised the end of famine for all its people. Less than a week later, they contradicted themselves by warning people of another possible famine in the near-future. People are growing upset over the incompetence of their government. People are pressuring the government to take real actions and Kim Jong-Un tried to ease this tension at home during the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, gesturing for harmony with South Korea and giving people hopes for more foreign aids and increase in their quality of lives.

With everyone having different agendas for this meeting, everything depends on North Korea’s attitude. I think for a change to come out of this meeting, North Korea must accept its own mistakes and be open to ending their nuclear program.

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Vegan And Meat-Eater Try Vegan Fish And Chips

Sutton and Sons in Stoke Newington, London is selling a vegan “fish and chips” made with banana blossom, seaweed, and samphire. The dish is served with a vegan, egg-free tartare sauce. It costs £7.50 takeaway or £8.50 eat in.

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Dropbox CEO On His $11 Billion IPO

Dropbox CEO Drew Houston famously turned down Steve Jobs when Jobs offered to acquire the company. After the rejection, Jobs not-so-subtly implied that he’d have to put Dropbox out of business instead.

On Friday, Dropbox went public, with its stock popping 35% by the end of the first day of trading, defying the rest of the bleak market.

Houston is probably feeling pretty good about rejecting the tech legend. He’s now a billionaire a few times over.

Going into Dropbox’s IPO Friday, there were worries that the company’s valuation would be well below the $10 billion that private investors pegged it at a few years ago. But those concerns were quickly squashed. It now has a market cap of $11.03 billion.

In an interview with Business Insider on Friday, CEO Houston said he wasn’t concerned about near-term stock price of his newly public company. He told his employees not to focus on what could have been, and could still be, a fluctuating stock price.

“One thing I tell the team is get used to the stock going up and down,” Houston said. “This will be a normal, everyday occurrence… that’s outside of our control. So what I make sure the team stays focused on is that our customers don’t care if we’re public or private. They just want a great experience.”

Dropbox is the first of the so-called tech unicorns — companies valued over $1 billion — to go public this year. Music streaming service Spotify will have its IPO in the coming weeks, and Lyft, Uber, and Airbnb, are all seen as the next major tech companies likely to go public either this year or next year.

“I think we’re all excited about this cohort of companies,” Houston said. “And I’m looking forward to see Daniel [Ek] take Spotify public. A lot of these founders are my friends. It’s certainly a lot of fun to watch them scale their businesses.” 

Houston’s take on Silicon Valley’s troubles

Dropbox may not be mired by accusations of spreading fake news or mishandling personal user data, but it is growing in an environment tainted by a lack of employee diversity. Dropbox released its latest employee diversity stats in February, and they don’t look much better than other Silicon Valley tech companies. Women make up 39% of Dropbox’s workforce, and the company is 55% white and 32% Asian.

Houston recently joined a group called Founders for Change, a coalition of tech companies and startups that have pledged not to take venture capital funding from groups that didn’t have a woman or person of color who could write the check.

It’s one of many efforts to fix the diversity problem in Silicon Valley, but it’s not going to happen overnight.

But one quick fix that can be made is the gender pay gap, when female employees are paid less for the same work. It’s simply a matter of analyzing salary data and making sure all employees are getting equal pay for the same work. Houston said that’s an issue Dropbox is looking at too.

“While as an industry we have a long way to go, there are things that are directly within companies’ control, and so by all means within our company we take a close look at gender pay equity, and I think everybody should,” Houston said. 

And then there’s the other black eye on Silicon Valley’s reputation. Facebook’s failure to protect user data that was given to third-party developers sent the company headfirst into one of its biggest crises since its founding. In a series of interviews this week, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he’d be open to some form of government regulation.

Even though Dropbox isn’t a major social network, Houston did say it’s responsible for keeping user data stored on its servers secure.

“We shouldn’t wait for [regulation],” Houston said. “I think we all realize that it’s critical that we trust all the services we use, and that’s certainly top of mind for us, as you can imagine.”

“I think what the government does from a regulation standpoint, from a policy standpoint, can go in a lot of different directions,” Houston later added. “But we want to make sure that we — whether as a public company or whether as a private company — are doing everything we can to keep our user’s information safe.”

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How North And South Korea Could Reunite

Hofstra University’s Professor Julian Ku explains the various factors that make Korean reunification extremely unlikely.

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Why Companies Constantly Conceal Facts – And Why That Might Not Be Such A Bad Thing

Business Insider UK spoke to Hector Macdonald, a business storytelling expert.

Macdonald talked about how businesses shape their narratives, and the techniques involved.

He believes that hiding the truth from employees is not necessarily a bad thing.

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Inside Cook Out — The South’s Most Underrated Restaurant

Cook Out is a popular fast-food restaurant located in the Southeast region of the United States. The affordability of the meals could give other similar restaurants a run for their money. Following is a transcript of the video.

Welcome to Cook Out.

A fast-food restaurant loved by all in the Southeast. It began in North Carolina, but quickly spread to surrounding states. With its low prices and variety, it keeps customers coming back for more. 

Jensen Rubinstein: So, we are at the best place in the world — Cook Out — which is only in Southeast America and we have amazing Cook Out trays for only $4.99. $4.99 gets you an entrée, two sides, so three things and a drink, and it’s amazing. So here we have a Big Double burger, as you can see we have two patties with very melted, delicious-looking cheese. It’s so juicy, so good. It’s quality fast food. 

You can have your pick of sides. But don’t forget the Southern staples, like their delicious sweet tea and their Cheerwine float. 

Jordan Rubinstein: I have the barbecue plate — and no eating-out experience in the South would be complete without barbecue. So for $3.99 at Cook Out, you get barbecue, a side of slaw, some hush puppies, and fries.

Jensen Rubinstein: One of the reasons people come to Cook Out is because of the amazing milkshakes they have. There are 40-plus flavors, all vanilla-based milkshakes and so I have the chocolate chip cheesecake milkshake that has a piece of cheesecake — yes, cheesecake — mixed in with chocolate chips. Tastes dreamy. It’s 32 degrees outside, but I’m still gonna eat it.

With a double drive-thru for faster service, you’ll be eating in no time. 

Jensen Rubinstein: If it sounds like everything is good at Cook Out, that’s because it is and the variety of items on the menu make it so different than any other fast-food place out there. They have hot dogs, corn dogs, quesadillas, ranch wraps, cajun wraps. The list goes on and on, but everything on the menu is amazing.

Living up to its name, Cook Out’s food is grilled “outdoor-style.” So rain or shine, you can still have a Cook Out.

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How This Restaurant Makes Its 16-Foot-Long Noodles

London restaurant Murger HanHan serves noodles that are 16-foot-long.

They are called Biang Biang noodles and are sold with different toppings including chilli oil, braised pork, and tomato and egg. There are also vegetarian versions.

Fresh noodle dough is made every day using flour, water, and salt. The dough is mixed, cut, and rolled in small pieces. 4 kilos of dough makes 32 individual noodles.

The noodles are hand-pulled in front of customers. Each noodle is pulled to 8-foot-long, rested for 10 seconds, and then pulled again to 16-foot-long.

The recipe is from Chinese city Xi’an in the Shan Xi province. The noodles there are made with wheat as the province does not harvest rice.

The restaurant sells around 90 Biang Biang noodle dishes a day.
A dish starts at £9.80 and changes depending on the toppings.

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How All You Can Eat Restaurants Make Money

With a few tricks, these restaurants still manage to turn a profit — despite offering endless food.

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We Flew On Warren Buffett’s NetJets Newest Private Plane

Business Insider UK flew in the newest plane in Warren Buffett’s NetJets fleet — and it’s seriously plush ride.

The jet is called the Citation Latitude, it has a good range and could reach Tel Aviv or Istanbul from London. The Citation seats seven passengers and has a maximum speed of 495mph.

NetJets have six types of aeroplane in its fleet, the largest seats 14 and can reach Los Angeles from London.

The company offers joint ownership on each jet and you can also purchase a private jet card which gives you 25 hours of flying time. The price of these jets is available on request.

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Did the market already hit its 2018 peak?

Read the full note here: https://bit.ly/2G3uRFC

US stocks reached new all-time highs in January before losing over 10% in just 9 trading days. Based on investor sentiment shifts over the past few months, Morgan Stanley says the equity market has probably already peaked for 2018. On the other hand, Fidelity sector strategist Denise Chisholm uses historical probability analysis to show that things often pick up after such a steep and fast correction.

Has the market already peaked for 2018?
Morgan Stanley outlines two reasons it’ll be difficult for stocks to get back to the record levels in January. “We think January was the top for sentiment, if not prices, for the year,” Mike Wilson, Morgan Stanley’s chief US equity strategist, wrote in a client note. “With volatility moving higher, we think it will be difficult for institutional clients to gross up to or beyond the January peaks.”

The second major risk facing US equity investors, Morgan Stanley says, is retail sentiment that appears to have already peaked. Individual investor bullishness hit a multiyear high earlier this year.

Clues from past corrections
Fidelity sector strategist Denise Chisholm looks for patterns in market history using historical probability analysis. She points out that even though corrections are normal the recent drop was unusually sharp. She looked back at market history and only found 10 other instances where the market fell as fast and sharp since 1960. Chisholm analysis shows that “the market has generally performed well following those sharp corrections, with positive 12-month returns 8 out of 10 times, and an average gain of 17%.”

The sell-off earlier this year was likely the result of investors getting spooked by high valuations paired with rising rates. However, Chisholm says rising rates don’t always mean bad news for stocks.

“I think most investors assume that falling interest rates have been better for the stock market than rising rates. But, in fact, looking back to 1955, the market has had better odds of an advance when rates are rising than when rates are falling. The reason for that seems to be that rates tend to rise when the economy is healthy, and a healthy economy is generally good for the market. So, historically at least, increasing interest rates do not by themselves indicate weakness in the stock market.”

From a historical probability standpoint, there is reason to be optimistic on US stocks following the recent correction. However, from a sentiment standpoint we may have have seen the peak for the year.

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How An Overweight 40-Year-Old Became A Top Ultra-Athlete

After shortness of breath from climbing the stairs at home, Rich Roll, author of Finding Ultra, decided to completely change his lifestyle. Dropping 60 lbs in 6 months, this out-of-shape dad became an ultra-endurance athlete at 39. Following is a transcript of the video.

Rich Roll: Ultra-endurance sports didn’t just change me physically, they actually gave me a brand new life. Throughout my 30s, I was climbing the corporate ladder, very intent on achieving the traditional idea of the American dream. But deep down inside, I started to question this path that I was on.

For well over a decade, I really hadn’t been taking care of myself. I had become a junk food addict, I was 50 pounds overweight, kind of semi-depressed, and shortly before I turned 40, I was climbing up a simple flight of stairs to go to bed one evening, and I had to pause halfway. I was winded, I was out of breath, I had tightness in my chest, and it was a very specific moment in time in which I realized that not only that I needed to change my lifestyle habits but that I had the willingness that I truly wanted to.

I realized that vague ideas of eating better or working out a little bit or going to the gym weren’t really going to work for me. I needed something specific, something definitive. I’d played around with a bunch of different diets, to no avail, and I sort of attempted this experiment in plant-based eating as kind of the last thing that I hadn’t explored. And I didn’t have a big expectation that it would make a big difference, but within about seven to 10 days of eating nothing but plants, nothing with a mother, nothing with a face, I experienced this extraordinary thing, like I had this resurgence in vitality, my mental acuity improved, my sleep improved, I had this sense of well-being and energy that I hadn’t really felt since I was a teenager. And I didn’t really know what I was doing, but I knew in that moment that I was onto something.

And it started getting me thinking about human potential and my own potential, because if I could make such a simple, basic shift and experience such a dramatic result, where were there other untapped reservoirs of potential that I could explore? And that’s what got me interested, ultimately, in the world of ultra-endurance sports.

At the peak of training, I would say I was training about 25 hours a week, so it was really almost a second job, and at the time, I was still a practicing attorney, I have four kids, I’m busy doing a lot of things, and in order to make the time that was required to appropriately prepare for this race, I had to make some significant cuts and really look hard and fast at how I was spending my time on a day-to-day basis. I had to get rid of late-night television and sort of business meetings that could be pushed to a conference call or an email chain to free up the time that was required so I could show up at the starting line and know in my heart of hearts that I could complete this race.

I started training, which really connected me with myself in a very profound way, and to the surprise of myself and many other people, I ended up showing some prowess in this field and ended up competing at a very high level, specifically a race called Ultraman, which is a double Ironman distance triathlon. Over the course of three days, it completely circumnavigates the entire big island of Hawaii.

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How A 1999 Russian Bombing Led To Putin’s Rise To Power

David Satter is a US journalist who spent decades covering Russian politics before he was expelled from the country after claiming that President Putin and the FSB may have been involved with the deadly Russia apartment bombings in 1999. 

We talked to Satter about the bombings at PutinCon, a summit organized by the Human Rights Foundation that gathered together some of Putin’s biggest critics. Following is a transcript of the video.

David Satter: You had to be deaf, dumb, and blind not to see what was going on. And in particular, you had to be willfully ignorant if you didn’t see the implications of the Ryazan incident.

David Satter is a US journalist and expert on Russian politics. He was expelled from Russia after claiming that Putin and the FSB were behind the apartment bombings

Satter: In the summer of 1999 the approval rating of former President Yeltsin was 2%. There appeared to be no chance whatever that Putin, who was designated by Yeltsin as his successor could possibly become the next Russian president. The apartment bombings changed everything. It was said after those buildings went up that now we’re living in a completely different country.

More than 200 people were killed in the September bombings. Russia blamed Chechen militants, triggering the second Chechen War.

Satter: Putin came forward as the savior of the country. He was put in charge of a war in Chechnya. The bombings were blamed on Chechens without any evidence whatsoever, and as a result of the successful prosecution of that war, against all odds he was elected the next Russian president. The apartment bombings appear to be the keystone of a plot to confuse Russian public opinion, to create terror, to distract the Russian public, to redirect their anger away from the corruption that had flourished under Yeltsin, and toward the Chechens who had had for a number of years a semi-independent government in Chechnya and in that way create the conditions for the Russian people to vote in what they absolutely consciously did not want, which was a successor to Yeltsin who would protect Yeltsin.

There was an enormous amount of material in the Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta which pointed to the possibility and in fact to the likelihood that the authorities themselves blew up those buildings. At the same time a fifth bomb was discovered in the basement of an apartment building in Ryazan, which is a city southeast of Moscow. And I went to Ryazan after the bomb was discovered and diffused to talk to local residents and it was clear from those conversations that what took place was a genuine attempt to blow up a fifth building. The authorities said that this was only a training exercise, but it was nothing of the kind.

And what was most important was that three persons were arrested for putting a bomb in a building in Ryazan. They turned out to be not Chechens, not terrorists in the usual sense, but rather agents of the Federal Securities Service which is the FSB.

I asked for documents from the CIA from the FBI, from the directorate of national intelligence from the state department. I got very, very little that was of any use. But I did get a few documents from the state department which indicated that their sources of information were telling them that the apartment bombings were extremely suspicious. You had to be deaf, dumb, and blind not to see what was going on. And in particular you had to be willfully ignorant if you didn’t see the implications of the Ryazan incident in which three FSB agents were arrested for putting a fifth bomb in a building, even though the bomb didn’t go off it was a live bomb. What was it doing in the basement of an apartment building?

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Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

1,000 Dachshunds Gathered For A Mass Walk In London

Over 1,000 dachshunds turned up at Greenwich Park for the third edition of the Sausage Walk London, an event where dachshund owners join to walk their dogs.

Dogs from all over the country turned up despite the cold weather and snow.

The event was founded by Katherine, Catherine, and Grace, the owners of Insta-famous dachshunds George and Mildred. They promoted the event on Instagram using the hashtag #SausageWalkLondon.

The first walk was in September 2017 and the event quickly went viral. The organisers hosted another walk in December 2017 which we also joined.

Organisers are using their reach to help less fortunate dogs, partnering with charitable initiative StreetVet to help homeless dogs in the street.

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Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

Do The Death Penalty And Longer Prison Sentences Deter Crime?

President Trump has called for the death penalty to be sentenced to some drug dealers. The decision comes after Attorney General Jeff Sessions called for longer and tougher prison sentences last year. Do these harsher sentences actually work to deter future crime, though?

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Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

This Could Be The Taxi Of The Future

This could be the taxi of the future. The EZ-GO is a concept by Renault. It’s a fully autonomous ride-hailing service. It doesn’t require a driver to be present. And if necessary, it could be controlled remotely. 

Hailing an EZ-GO is simple. It’s all done through the app. 1) Choose your experience. You can choose a private ride or share with others. 2) Reserve your seats. The EZ-GO would seat up to six. It could also take tourists on a guided tour. 3) Get in and go. The door lifts vertically allowing riders to walk in upright. A ramp also makes the EZ-GO more accessible.

The interior is designed for comfort. Sofa-style seating. 360-degree windows. In-car WiFi and wireless charging. A display shows your travel information. Renault sees a need for new mobility solutions in cities today. EZ-GO aims to solve those issues. Would you reserve this ride?

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Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

This 8-Pound Sandwich Is Made With Five Kinds Of Meat And Costs $375

This 8-pound sandwich costs $375! It’s made with five kinds of meat and smothered in cheese fondue.

Benjamin Steakhouse Prime offers the sandwich on the bar menu. It’s called “The BMT Meat Stack.”“BMT” stands for BACON. MEAT. TOMATO. 

Jesus Nunez, Chef: We played with the idea of the BLT. Bacon, lettuce, tomato — and we say, ‘Okay, screw the lettuce, and let’s do the BMT — bacon, MEAT, and tomato.

Here’s what makes it so expensive…

The sandwich includes every cut of beef from the steakhouse in a single bite.

First up, a one-pound burger patty.

Then one pound of bacon. Caramelized onions to make the sandwich extra juicy. One pound of filet mignon.

Two pounds of rib eye. Sun-dried heirloom tomatoes. Two pounds of New York strip. It’s all drenched in melty cheese. And sandwiched between rosemary focaccia bread.

Jesus Nunez, Chef: We want to represent our brand with our product, our quality, and all of the cuts that you can find in the broiler in a plate. We decide to use them and put them into sandwich form.

Aly Weisman: This sandwich is for when you’re really ‘hangry’ and you need something to bring you back to being a nice person again.

Jesus Nunez, Chef: It’s a perfect sandwich to serve.    Four, five, six people eating this sandwich is like having a barbeque in winter.  

Aly Weisman: I don’t even know how to attempt this. There’s no way that this is a one-biter. This is like an 18-biter. 

The sandwich must be ordered 72 hours in advance.

But it’s worth planning ahead!

Aly Weisman: I’m full, I surrender!

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Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.