C. African educational farm develops innovative techniques

Environmentalist farmer Pascal Bida Koyagbele campaigned in France against GMOs and returned to Central Africa to create an organic farm in Bangui where he has since trained “soldiers of the earth”. The President of the Association of Central African Agricultural Workers’ Association (APC), which is based Bangui, launched an organic farm in the capital last year where he grows fruits and vegetables.

France hands over 1400 assault rifles to C.Africa

France hands over 1,400 assault rifles to the Central African armed forces (Faca), thus reaffirming, in the face of Russia’s growing influence, its support for the conflict-torn country. French Defence Minister Florence Parly oversaw the handover at a ceremony at M’Polo military base in the capital Bangui. IMAGES

Africa Weekly – a round up of news and features from Africa

This week on Africa Weekly, we meet the cyclists in war-torn Bangui whose hopes are riding on a revival of the competitive sport, we travel to the Moroccan city of Chefchouan as it undergoes a ‘green’ revolution, and we meet perhaps the world’s oldest terrestrial animal, Jonathan the tortoise.FOR SUBSCRIBERS OF AFRICA WEEKLY ONLY

Africa Weekly – a round up of news and features from Africa

This week on Africa Weekly, we meet the cyclists in war-torn Bangui whose hopes are riding on a revival of the competitive sport, we travel to the Moroccan city of Chefchouan as it undergoes a ‘green’ revolution, and we meet perhaps the world’s oldest terrestrial animal, Jonathan the tortoise.FOR SUBSCRIBERS OF AFRICA WEEKLY ONLY

Diamonds and Sacrifices (Excerpt from ‘United in Hate: Central African Republic’)

In March 2013, the Seleka, a coalition of predominantly Muslim-armed groups from the northeast, marched on the Central African Republic’s capital Bangui and seized power.

They committed mass atrocities against the population, and to the largely Christian population in the southwest, Muslims began to be associated with violence. They took up arms to form a Christian self-defense militia called the anti-balaka, and carried out revenge killings.

By the end of 2013, the Central African Republic had descended into civil war. Under pressure from the international community, the Seleka were forced to give up power and retreated towards the northeast, where they regrouped.

A United Nations peacekeeping mission and a French military operation were able to stem the fighting, but despite their presence, the transitional government has not been able to regain control of the country outside Bangui.

With the anti-balaka controlling the southwest, and the Seleka controlling the northeast, the Central African Republic is de facto partitioned along ethno-religious lines. For those who find themselves on the wrong side of the divide, life has become hell.

In this excerpt, the coordinator of the anti-balaka movement in Carnot takes VICE News to a diamond mine he oversees, which was reclaimed from Muslim owners during the recent conflict.
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Watch “United in Hate: The Fight for Control in CAR” – http://bit.ly/1O38HyY

Read “Fighting Erupts in Central African Republic as Rebels Attempt to Disrupt Key Vote” – http://bit.ly/1J9xSPi

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Inside PK5 (Extra Scene from ‘United in Hate: Central African Republic’)

Watch the full length: http://bit.ly/1O38HyY

In March 2013, the Seleka, a coalition of predominantly Muslim-armed groups from the northeast, marched on the Central African Republic’s capital Bangui and seized power.

They committed mass atrocities against the population, and to the largely Christian population in the southwest, Muslims began to be associated with violence. They took up arms to form a Christian self-defense militia called the anti-balaka, and carried out revenge killings.

By the end of 2013, the Central African Republic had descended into civil war. Under pressure from the international community, the Seleka were forced to give up power and retreated towards the northeast, where they regrouped.

A United Nations peacekeeping mission and a French military operation were able to stem the fighting, but despite their presence, the transitional government has not been able to regain control of the country outside Bangui.

With the anti-balaka controlling the southwest, and the Seleka controlling the northeast, the Central African Republic is de facto partitioned along ethno-religious lines. For those who find themselves on the wrong side of the divide, life has become hell.

In this extra scene, VICE News goes to PK5, a predominantly Muslim enclave of the Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui, which has seen some of the most violent and brutal fighting between Muslim and Christian communities since the start of the conflict.

Watch “United in Hate: The Fight for Control in CAR” – http://bit.ly/1O38HyY

Read “Fighting Erupts in Central African Republic as Rebels Attempt to Disrupt Key Vote” – http://bit.ly/1J9xSPi

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United in Hate: The Fight for Control in CAR

In March 2013, the Seleka, a coalition of predominantly Muslim-armed groups from the northeast, marched on the Central African Republic’s capital Bangui and seized power.

They committed mass atrocities against the population, and to the largely Christian population in the southwest, Muslims began to be associated with violence. They took up arms to form a Christian self-defense militia called the anti-balaka, and carried out revenge killings.

By the end of 2013, the Central African Republic had descended into civil war. Under pressure from the international community, the Seleka were forced to give up power and retreated towards the northeast, where they regrouped.

A United Nations peacekeeping mission and a French military operation were able to stem the fighting, but despite their presence, the transitional government has not been able to regain control of the country outside Bangui.

With the anti-balaka controlling the southwest, and the Seleka controlling the northeast, the Central African Republic is de facto partitioned along ethno-religious lines. For those who find themselves on the wrong side of the divide, life has become hell.

VICE News travels to Carnot, a mining town at the heart of the Central African Republic’s diamond region controlled by the anti-balaka, where 500 Muslims are hiding in a church to stay alive. On the other side of the country in Bambari, ex-Seleka rebels are terrorizing the Christian population, with thousands forced to seek shelter in a cotton factory following renewed fighting.

Watch “Blood Diamonds and Religious War: Diamonds and Division” – http://bit.ly/1Yy8U5f

Read “Celebrations and Tight Security as Pope Francis Lands in a Conflict Zone” – http://bit.ly/1lUz2ck

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United in Hate: Central African Republic (Trailer)

In March 2013, the Seleka, a coalition of predominantly Muslim-armed groups from the northeast, marched on the Central African Republic’s capital Bangui and seized power.

They committed mass atrocities against the population, and to the largely Christian population in the southwest, Muslims began to be associated with violence. They took up arms to form a Christian self-defense militia called the anti-balaka, and carried out revenge killings.

By the end of 2013, the Central African Republic had descended into civil war. Under pressure from the international community, the Seleka were forced to give up power and retreated towards the northeast, where they regrouped.

A United Nations peacekeeping mission and a French military operation were able to stem the fighting, but despite their presence, the transitional government has not been able to regain control of the country outside Bangui.

With the anti-balaka controlling the southwest, and the Seleka controlling the northeast, the Central African Republic is de facto partitioned along ethno-religious lines. For those who find themselves on the wrong side of the divide, life has become hell.

VICE News goes to the Central African Republic, to witness a brutal fight for economic and political control and find out what’s happening to those caught in the middle.

Watch “Blood Diamonds and Religious War: Diamonds and Division” – http://bit.ly/1Yy8U5f

Read “Spiraling Violence Puts Brakes on Central African Republic’s Journey to Democracy” – http://bit.ly/21k09y1

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C.A.R. Protesters Demand Exit of UN and France: VICE News Quick Hit

Thousands marched in the capital Bangui on Monday to call for the exit of French troops and UN peacekeepers. Demonstrators want an end to the transitional government and for the military to reassume its role in restoring security following years of conflict. Sectarian violence has killed more than 30 people since Saturday.

Watch more Quick Hits at VICE News – http://bit.ly/1MOsgQA

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VICE News Daily: Iraq’s Yazidis Demand Return of Captured Women

The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Iraqi protesters call for rescue of Yazidi women and girls, UN peacekeeper killed in the Central African Republic, Pakistan frees imprisoned Indian fishermen, and Yemen’s water shortage is worsening.

IRAQ
Yazidis Protest Lack of Action on Captured Women
The Islamic State abducted thousands from the minority sect a year ago, and several thousand remain in captivity.

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
UN Peacekeeper Killed in Attack
Officials have not released the nationality of the peacekeeper, who was killed in an attack in the capital Bangui. Eight other peacekeepers were wounded.

PAKISTAN
Dozens of Indian Fishermen Freed From Jail
Maritime boundaries are poorly defined, so authorities from both countries routinely arrest fishermen who wander into their territory.

YEMEN
War Worsens Water Shortage
The number of people who lack drinking water has doubled to nearly 20 million since the Saudi-led military coalition began targeting Houthi rebels four months ago.

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VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – April 1, 2014.

The VICE News Capsule is a daily roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: North and South Korea exchange fire, Indian opposition party shows promise ahead of national elections, dozens are killed by Chadian soldiers in the Central African Republic’s capital and protests over police brutality in the American state of New Mexico.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

North & South Korea Exchange Fire
North Korea fired hundreds of artillery rounds into South Korean waters during a military exercise on Monday. The south responded by firing back into North Korea’s waters.

India: Polls Show Opposition’s Strength Ahead of Elections
One week before India’s national elections begin, a newly released opinion poll shows that Indians are widely dissatisfied with their current government.

Dozens Killed by Chadian Soldiers in Bangui
Local authorities say that Chadian peacekeeping soldiers killed more than 20 people in the Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui.

Protests Over Police Brutality Turn Violent
Protesters clashed with police on the streets of Albuquerque New Mexico over the weekend following the release of a video that depicted police shooting and killing a homeless man.

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War in the Central African Republic (Full Length)

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 5/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 4/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 3/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 2/5 (Documentary)

Start from the beginning and watch part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwJEtTMUkzM&list=PLw613M86o5o49tFIS5fmyazINYSkbzV6_&src_vid=Em7w7WSwaMk&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_2360488599

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
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War in the Central African Republic: Part 1/5 (Documentary)

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

The Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui has seen its Muslim population drop from 130,000 to under 1000 over the past few months. Over the past year, thousands across CAR have been killed and nearly a million have been displaced. The United Nations recently stated that the entire Western half of the country has now been cleansed of Muslims.

CAR has never fully recovered from France’s colonial rule, and it has only known ten years of a civilian government – from 1993 to 2003 – since achieving independence in 1960. Coup after coup, often with French military involvement, has led many to refer to the country as a phantom state. The current conflict has now completely erased the rule of law and order, and left the UN and international community looking confused and impotent.

In March 2013, the Séléka, a mostly Muslim rebel alliance, rose up and overthrew the corrupt government of François Bozizé, while bringing terror and chaos across the country – pillaging, killing and raping with impunity. In response, mostly Christian self-defense forces, called the anti-balaka, formed to defend CAR against Séléka attacks.

Clashes grew more frequent throughout 2013 as the Séléka grew more ruthless. In December 2013, French and African troops went in to disarm the Séléka and staunch the bloodshed. The anti-balaka, seizing on a weakened Séléka, then went on the offensive.

CAR had no real history of religious violence, and the current conflict is not based on any religious ideology. The fighting, however, turned increasingly sectarian in the fall of 2013, with revenge killings becoming the norm. And as the Séléka’s power waned, the anti-balaka fed their need for revenge by brutalizing Muslim civilians.

“Too few peacekeepers were deployed too late; the challenge of disarming the Séléka, containing the anti-balaka, and protecting the Muslim minority was underestimated,” Human Rights Watch said in a recent statement.

The bloodshed has not stopped. The UN is still debating whether or not to send peacekeepers. Even if a peacekeeping operation is approved, it will take six months for troops to be assembled.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
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