C. African educational farm develops innovative techniques

Environmentalist farmer Pascal Bida Koyagbele campaigned in France against GMOs and returned to Central Africa to create an organic farm in Bangui where he has since trained “soldiers of the earth”. The President of the Association of Central African Agricultural Workers’ Association (APC), which is based Bangui, launched an organic farm in the capital last year where he grows fruits and vegetables.

France hands over 1400 assault rifles to C.Africa

France hands over 1,400 assault rifles to the Central African armed forces (Faca), thus reaffirming, in the face of Russia’s growing influence, its support for the conflict-torn country. French Defence Minister Florence Parly oversaw the handover at a ceremony at M’Polo military base in the capital Bangui. IMAGES

Africa Weekly – a round up of news and features from Africa

This week on Africa Weekly, we meet the cyclists in war-torn Bangui whose hopes are riding on a revival of the competitive sport, we travel to the Moroccan city of Chefchouan as it undergoes a ‘green’ revolution, and we meet perhaps the world’s oldest terrestrial animal, Jonathan the tortoise.FOR SUBSCRIBERS OF AFRICA WEEKLY ONLY

Africa Weekly – a round up of news and features from Africa

This week on Africa Weekly, we meet the cyclists in war-torn Bangui whose hopes are riding on a revival of the competitive sport, we travel to the Moroccan city of Chefchouan as it undergoes a ‘green’ revolution, and we meet perhaps the world’s oldest terrestrial animal, Jonathan the tortoise.FOR SUBSCRIBERS OF AFRICA WEEKLY ONLY

Diamonds and Sacrifices (Excerpt from ‘United in Hate: Central African Republic’)

In March 2013, the Seleka, a coalition of predominantly Muslim-armed groups from the northeast, marched on the Central African Republic’s capital Bangui and seized power.

They committed mass atrocities against the population, and to the largely Christian population in the southwest, Muslims began to be associated with violence. They took up arms to form a Christian self-defense militia called the anti-balaka, and carried out revenge killings.

By the end of 2013, the Central African Republic had descended into civil war. Under pressure from the international community, the Seleka were forced to give up power and retreated towards the northeast, where they regrouped.

A United Nations peacekeeping mission and a French military operation were able to stem the fighting, but despite their presence, the transitional government has not been able to regain control of the country outside Bangui.

With the anti-balaka controlling the southwest, and the Seleka controlling the northeast, the Central African Republic is de facto partitioned along ethno-religious lines. For those who find themselves on the wrong side of the divide, life has become hell.

In this excerpt, the coordinator of the anti-balaka movement in Carnot takes VICE News to a diamond mine he oversees, which was reclaimed from Muslim owners during the recent conflict.
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Watch “United in Hate: The Fight for Control in CAR” – http://bit.ly/1O38HyY

Read “Fighting Erupts in Central African Republic as Rebels Attempt to Disrupt Key Vote” – http://bit.ly/1J9xSPi

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