Posted on

Today in History for October 17th

(17 Oct 2018) Highlights of this day in history: Arab oil embargo fuels energy crisis; Americans clinch revolutionary victory at Saratoga; Deadly quake hits northern California; Mobster Al Capone convicted of tax evasion; Playwright Arthur Miller born. (Oct. 17)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

Posted on

Kavanaugh officially sworn in as Supreme Court Justice

Donald Trump apologizes on behalf of all Americans for the “pain and suffering” the new US Supreme Court Justice endured in his nomination process while Brett Kavanaugh insists he has “no bitterness” over the bruising hearings.

Posted on

Matthew Rhys’ terrifying Emmy winning experience

(18 Sep 2018) Backstage at the Primetime Emmy Awards, winner for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Matthew Rhys jokes about finally winning an award for his work on “The Americans” and the scary experience of giving a winner’s speech. (Sept. 18)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e139a0eb9ec3992f416690bb15a64dc8

Posted on

17 Years Since 9/11 And There’s Still No Clear End To The War In Afghanistan (HBO)

As Americans mark the anniversary of 9/11, the war that was launched in response to those attacks shows no sign of ending.

Seventeen years later, American troops are still fighting and dying, civilian casualties are at record highs, and the Taliban now controls more territory than at any point since 2001.

Earlier this month, a new American general took control of the effort — the ninth change of command in what is now the longest war the United States has ever fought.

Outgoing U.S. commander General John Nicholson had a simple message as he handed over reigns to his successor after being in command for the last two years: “It’s time for the war in Afghanistan to end.”

But how the war might actually end remains anyone’s guess. The Trump administration appears to be looking for way to get out — and pinning its hopes on encouraging peace talks between the two sides. In July, a high-level State Department official met with Taliban leaders at their headquarters in Doha, the militants said, to encourage them to come to the table.

“Nearly all of these conflicts won’t be solved militarily, the military aspect of it has to apply pressure, has to get people to the table and ultimately its a political solution that’s got to take hold here,” General Joseph Votel, commander of United States Central Command, told VICE News.

Votel pushed back against critics who view negotiating with the Taliban as some sort of defeat.

“I don’t look at it that way,” Votel said. “That’s what the object of the strategy is, it’s to get that reconciliation and reconciliation can only be done by talking — so we’ve got to get to that. I don’t see that as a defeat at all.”

But for the moment, the Taliban don’t seem very interested in reconciliation.

Four weeks ago, fighters scored their biggest victory in years, overrunning the city of Ghazni, less than a hundred miles from Kabul, and killing dozens of Afghan soldiers and police officers in the process.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo

Posted on

The International Criminal Court

Videographic on the International Criminal Court. The US has threatened to arrest and sanction ICC judges and other officials if the court moves to charge Americans who served in Afghanistan with war crimes.VIDEOGRAPHICS

Posted on

Barack Obama is jumping back into campaign-mode

(8 Sep 2018) Former President Barack Obama says the midterm elections in November will give Americans the chance to — in his words — “restore some sanity in our politics” by changing control of Congress. (Sept. 8)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c5b34cd0a9d0b6886435cf7ab998e98e

Posted on

Nike Probably Doesn’t Mind If Angry White Dudes Burn Their Shoes (HBO)

Over the Labor Day weekend, some people chose to exercise their rights as Americans to burn their shoes.

They uploaded videos and images of themselves destroying their own Nike products to protest Nike’s new campaign, which features the face of Colin Kaepernick and the caption, “Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.”

The ad references Kaepernick’s choice to kneel during the pregame national anthem in protest of police treatment of minorities — a protest that, according to multiple polls, most Americans don’t approve of. So why would a company as big as Nike want to sacrifice a big chunk of their customer base for politics?

In short, because it’s not politics. It’s business. And Nike is gambling that the people who are angry about the ad won’t affect their bottom line much.

“I think Nike is very okay with losing those people as customers,” says Ian Schafer, founder and former CEO of Deep Focus, which has worked with Nike in the past.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo

Posted on

Air raid warning tech gives Syrians life-saving minutes

Syrians subscribe to a warning system that alerts them on their phones of the incoming threat of air strikes in Syria’s rebel-held province of Idlib, giving residents more time to take cover. The Sentry programme, launched two years ago by two Americans and a Syrian coder, uses human observers and a network of sensors to compute a predicted impact location when Syrian or allied Russian warplanes take off.

Posted on

Most Black Kids Can’t Swim. It’s Not Just A Stereotype, It’s History. (HBO)

In 2014, the CDC found that an 11-year-old black child is 10 times more likely to drown than a white child the same age. The idea that “Black people can’t swim” may sound like a stereotype, but this disparity is rooted in a history of discriminatory access to swimming pools.

This summer has produced three high-profile incidents of white Americans calling – or threatening to call – the police on Black pool goers.

A South Carolina woman was charged with multiple accounts of assault for accosting a 15-year-old boy and a police officer. A North Carolina man lost his job after a video of him calling the police on a woman who refused to show him her identification. A property manager at a Memphis apartment complex also lost her job for calling the police on a man for wearing socks in the pool.

These episodes are just the most recent in a long history of discriminatory access at American swimming pools, going back almost 100 years. VICE News spoke with Jeff Wiltse, a professor of History at the University of Montana, and the author of “Contested Waters: A Social History of Swimming Pools in America.”

“It was socially normal for blacks and whites to swim together at these public pools during the late 19th and early 20th century but that all changed during the 1920s and 1930s when cities opened up large resort like pools,” says Wiltse. “That permitted males and females to use them together.”

Wiltse said that it was at that point that white swimmers and public officials imposed racial segregation because most whites did not want to allow black men to interact with white women at such intimate public spaces.

Pools were desegregated after World War II — frequently by court order — but like America’s public schools, integration in the water was more of a legal concept than a cultural one.

Racial desegregation of public pools rarely lead to meaningful sort of interracial use, said Wiltse. “In general, whites abandoned public pools that black swimmers started to use.”

“Swimming became broadly popular within white communities and was passed down from generation to generation. Because of African-Americans more restricted access, swimming did not become a broadly popular activity among Black families.”

In 2017, USA Swimming, the governing body for the sport of swimming in the US, has found that African-American children and their parents are three times more fearful of drowning than Caucasian children and parents. Additionally, 64% of African American children have low or no swimming ability.

Dezria Holmes knows how to swim, but wouldn’t call herself a strong swimmer. She’s trying to change that for her children, 12-year old Madison and 7-year old Mason. Both are enrolled in a Chicago swimming program launched by USA Swimming, Chicago Park District, and Illinois Swimming to get a more diverse group of young people in the water.

“My grandparents couldn’t swim because of segregation,” said Holmes. “So when I saw the opportunity for my daughter to swim, and then my parents were able to see their granddaughter swim. They were actually crying, because no one in our family swims like Madison. So to be afforded this opportunity has just been amazing.”

USA Swimming has found that Black children and their parents are three times more fearful of drowning than white children and their parents. Safety was the main reason Holmes wanted her kids to learn how to swim.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo