US marks the arrival of Angela, the ‘Eve’ of enslaved Africans | AFP

Angela, one of the first known African slaves brought to British North America, appears in records in 1619, arriving after a long and arduous journey that saw her ripped from her homeland in present-day Angola, forced to endure a sea voyage across the Atlantic, attacked by pirates and ultimately forced to work for British settlers in Jamestown, Virginia. 400 years after her arrival, the country looks back on America’s beginnings, and what would lay the foundation for slavery, as well as inequality and hardship that still exist today.

Abonnez-vous à la chaîne de l’AFP, et pensez à activer les notifications 🔔
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCckz6n8QccTd6K_xdwKqa0A/?sub_confirmation=1

Pence reaffirms US plans to go to Moon, then Mars

Vice President Mike Pence led the 6th meeting of the National Space Council Tuesday, touting America’s commitment to space exploration. Pence reaffirmed the administration’s pledge to return to the Moon by 2024 and then continue on to Mars. (Aug. 20)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/3b0a21de009470becc7541e5ff8a1f73

Americans Told Us How Their Lives Have Been Torn Apart By Gun Violence

As the U.S. was still reeling from back-to-back mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, we started asking Americans from different generations and walks of life how gun violence in the country has impacted them personally.

Then, on Wednesday night, an armed man shot six police officers in north Philadelphia during an eight-hour standoff.

“When Columbine happened, I felt like ‘What’s going to happen now? Are they going to change the gun laws?’ But nothing happened. Then Sandy Hook happened and I thought ‘Now they’re really going to do something about it’ and nothing happened,” Diana Torres, 42, said. “At this point, I feel like what else has to happen for this to change?”

America’s rate of murder or manslaughter by firearm is the highest in the developed world.

“It’s really been normalized that gun violence is a part of my everyday life,” said Jolie Simone Barga, 14. “We don’t feel safe at school. We don’t feel safe going to the movie theater. We don’t go and feel safe at a store.”

Every day, 100 Americans are killed with guns, and hundreds more are injured, according to Everytown research. Families, friends, colleagues, and communities are left with the loss of loved ones and with persistent fear about the next mass shooting.

“This isn’t just a problem that happened in El Paso or a problem that happened in Dayton, Ohio. It can happen anywhere,” Barga said. “Just because it was in those places the other day, [doesn’t mean] that it can be in your hometown the next.”
Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo

Pence: ‘We will confront this evil in our time’

Vice President Mike Pence echoed President Donald Trump in his first public speech about this weekend’s mass shootings saying, “hate has no place in America.” He also said, “We will confront this evil in our time.” (Aug. 6)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/64531baa3fb9bc2b0ca5dea6e4194f06

Acupuncture? Hydrotherapy? Pets in America now get human treatment | AFP

Acupuncture for dogs? Hydrotherapy for cats? As pet ownership in the US has increased to nearly 85 million households, so too has the variety of treatments available for our furry friends. With some treatments costing upwards of $5,000 and trendy diets seeping their way into pet foods, the industry is beginning to mirror its human counterpart.

Abonnez-vous à la chaîne de l’AFP, et pensez à activer les notifications 🔔
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCckz6n8QccTd6K_xdwKqa0A/?sub_confirmation=1