US marks the arrival of Angela, the ‘Eve’ of enslaved Africans | AFP

Angela, one of the first known African slaves brought to British North America, appears in records in 1619, arriving after a long and arduous journey that saw her ripped from her homeland in present-day Angola, forced to endure a sea voyage across the Atlantic, attacked by pirates and ultimately forced to work for British settlers in Jamestown, Virginia. 400 years after her arrival, the country looks back on America’s beginnings, and what would lay the foundation for slavery, as well as inequality and hardship that still exist today.

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Africans flee to South America on journey to US

Hundreds of Africans are joining Central American migrants on the long, dangerous journey for seeking asylum in the US. One family shares their experience after fleeing the Democratic Republic of Congo through South America. (July 16)

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‘Scared’ World Cup migrants face Russia deportation

Like thousands of other Africans, Lamin came to Russia during the 2018 tournament on a “Fan ID” that allowed spectators to bypass the country’s usual visa requirements. While most came purely to watch the football, others had plans to stay on and find work or claim asylum in Russia. But seven months after the World Cup, their hopes are dashed and the Russian interior ministry has said it is stepping up measures to deport all over-staying guests by the end of March.

Traditional medicine wins with decriminalisation of cannabis

The 18th of September marked the historic South African Constitutional Court judgment on the decriminalisation of personal use, cultivation and possession of cannabis in the private space. Traditional healers across the country, from various communities came together to celebrate this verdict dubbing it a landmark for traditional medicine and Africans across the continent. The benefits of this Constitutional Court ruling will not only be felt by the traditional healers themselves, but the vast communities of patients which they heal.

Parisians protest outside Libyan Embassy against slave auctions

Hundreds of people gathered outside the Libyan Embassy in Paris, Friday, after footage emerged earlier this month of Africans being sold at slave auctions in Libya. Protesters held placards denouncing the response of the Libyan government and demanded that world leaders tackle modern-day slavery. The rally was organised by several French human rights organisations.

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Bones of freed slaves ‘haunt’ St. Helena island

They made it to freedom, just about — hundreds of Africans who were rescued from slave traders in the 19th century were taken to the remote island of St Helena, but many of them died of their injuries. Their graves were discovered in 2008 during work to build a road for the new airport, but a decade on the remains are still in storage, with campaigners hoping they will one day receive a dignified burial.

The Man Who Relives Slave History Through Food (HBO)

Culinary historian Michael Twitty has made a name for himself touring the country to lecture about southern food traditions. His new book, ‘The Cooking Gene,’ is out today. The book explores the history of cuisine in the American south, by focusing on the people who laid the foundation for it — enslaved Africans. Twitty is currently on a teaching residency in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. VICE New’s Dexter Thomas joined him there for a meal.

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Waterfront Mansions Taking Over (Extra Scene from ‘Gullah Geechee Nation’)

Watch the Full Documentary – http://bit.ly/1P7FZh7

On the Sea Islands along the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia, a painful chapter of American history is playing out again. These islands are home to the Gullah or Geechee people, the descendants of enslaved Africans who were brought to work at the plantations that once ran down the southern Atlantic coast. After the Civil War, many former slaves on the Sea Islands bought portions of the land where their descendants have lived and farmed for generations. That property, much of it undeveloped waterfront land, is now some of the most expensive real estate in the country.

But the Gullah are now discovering that land ownership on the Sea Islands isn’t quite what it seemed. Local landowners are struggling to hold on to their ancestral land as resort developers with deep pockets exploit obscure legal loopholes to force the property into court-mandated auctions. These tactics have successfully fueled a tourism boom that now attracts more than 2 million visitors a year. Gullah communities have all but disappeared, replaced by upscale resorts and opulent gated developments that new locals — golfers, tourists, and mostly white retirees — fondly call “plantations.”

Faced with an epic case of déjà vu, the Gullah are scrambling for solutions as their livelihood and culture vanish, one waterfront mansion at a time.

In this extra scene, Gullah fisherman Henry Chisholm takes VICE News out on the water, where we saw the golf courses and waterfront mansions displacing Gullah communities on full display.

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A Vanishing History: Gullah Geechee Nation

On the Sea Islands along the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia, a painful chapter of American history is playing out again. These islands are home to the Gullah or Geechee people, the descendants of enslaved Africans who were brought to work at the plantations that once ran down the southern Atlantic coast. After the Civil War, many former slaves on the Sea Islands bought portions of the land where their descendants have lived and farmed for generations. That property, much of it undeveloped waterfront land, is now some of the most expensive real estate in the country.

But the Gullah are now discovering that land ownership on the Sea Islands isn’t quite what it seemed. Local landowners are struggling to hold on to their ancestral land as resort developers with deep pockets exploit obscure legal loopholes to force the property into court-mandated auctions. These tactics have successfully fueled a tourism boom that now attracts more than 2 million visitors a year. Gullah communities have all but disappeared, replaced by upscale resorts and opulent gated developments that new locals — golfers, tourists, and mostly white retirees — fondly call “plantations.”

Faced with an epic case of déjà vu, the Gullah are scrambling for solutions as their livelihood and culture vanish, one waterfront mansion at a time.

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A Vanishing History: Gullah Geechee Nation (Trailer)

On the Sea Islands along the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia, a painful chapter of American history is playing out again. These islands are home to the Gullah or Geechee people, the descendants of enslaved Africans who were brought to work at the plantations that once ran down the southern Atlantic coast. After the Civil War, many former slaves on the Sea Islands bought portions of the land where their descendants have lived and farmed for generations. That property, much of it undeveloped waterfront land, is now some of the most expensive real estate in the country.

But the Gullah are now discovering that land ownership on the Sea Islands isn’t quite what it seemed. Local landowners are struggling to hold on to their ancestral land as resort developers with deep pockets exploit obscure legal loopholes to force the property into court-mandated auctions. These tactics have successfully fueled a tourism boom that now attracts more than 2 million visitors a year. Gullah communities have all but disappeared, replaced by upscale resorts and opulent gated developments that new locals — golfers, tourists, and mostly white retirees — fondly call “plantations.”

Faced with an epic case of déjà vu, the Gullah are scrambling for solutions as their livelihood and culture vanish, one waterfront mansion at a time.

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Cannabis goes on trial in South Africa

In South Africa your life can swiftly descent into hell when you smoke cannabis. This is what happened to Myrtle Clarke and Jules Stobbs. They lived their ordinary lives as television producers, where smokers and got caught.

Cannabis goes on trial

In South Africa there are around 3 million people using cannabis. It is the first country in the world where cannabis use was banned and that was as early as 1908. The main reason; To control that part of the population which was using Cannabis the most at that time, mostly the black Africans and the Indians. Until today Dagga, which is South African slang for cannabis, remains a schedule one ‘drug’ alongside heroin.

Cannabis News Network visited several locations in and around Johannesburg, South Africa’s biggest city, to purchase weed. Consumers are often forced to buy substandard weed, grown on toxic mine dumps.

For the average consumer, dealers are the only way to get cannabis. Only the people with more money or better connections can afford to buy decent strains.

Nowadays Jules and Myrtle are public figures, known as The Dagga couple. They often appear in the media and travel around the world to garner support. In 2014 they visited the Cannabis Culture Award in Amsterdam where activists and cannabis idealists come together. Their story is larger than just South Africa.

For the last five years Jules and Myrtle have been preparing for a trial of the Cannabis plant. They will call on expert witnesses to proof their case. They started a crowdfunding campaign called ‘The Trial of The Plant’ in order to set a legal precedent in South African law.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-trial-of-the-plant#/story

Their case is due to be heard in the Pretoria High Court in March 2016.

Cannabis News Network is a news journal which publishes only cannabis related news.

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Albino Murders in Tanzania (Excerpt from ‘VICE News Meets Josephat Torner’)

A string of murders that began in 2000 has now left more than 72 albinos in Tanzania dead. These killings are believed to be motivated by the lucrative trade in albino body parts, which some Africans believe possess magical powers.

Tanzania has now been listed by the United Nations as the African nation where albinos are targeted for murder the most. According to long-standing traditions in the country, albinos are believed to be ghosts who are cursed, but whose body parts can ward off bad luck, and bring the owner wealth and success. In response to these killings, in January 2015 Tanzania banned witch doctors.

In East Africa, one child in 3,000 is born albino, compared to one in 20,000 in the United States. In Tanzania, albino advocacy groups estimate the number of albinos to be somewhere above 100,000 in a population of nearly 50 million people.

VICE News traveled to Tanzania to meet with Josephat Torner, an albino activist who has dedicated his life to raising awareness and acceptance towards albinos in his country, while debunking the widespread myths and superstitions surrounding the congenital disorder.

In this excerpt, Josephat talks about the witchdoctor-motivated albino killings and discusses instances where family members have facilitated these murders.

Watch “VICE News Meets Jospehat Torner” – http://bit.ly/1FzTiUi

Read “Another Albino Child Is Murdered and Mutilated in Tanzania” – http://bit.ly/1AP72tr

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Albino Activism in Tanzania: VICE News Meets Josephat Torner

A string of murders that began in 2000 has now left more than 72 albinos in Tanzania dead. These killings are believed to be motivated by the lucrative trade in albino body parts, which some Africans believe possess magical powers.

Tanzania has now been listed by the United Nations as the African nation where albinos are targeted for murder the most. According to long-standing traditions in the country, albinos are believed to be ghosts who are cursed, but whose body parts can ward off bad luck, and bring the owner wealth and success. In response to these killings, in January 2015 Tanzania banned witch doctors.

In East Africa, one child in 3,000 is born albino, compared to one in 20,000 in the United States. In Tanzania, albino advocacy groups estimate the number of albinos to be somewhere above 100,000 in a population of nearly 50 million people.

VICE News traveled to Tanzania to meet with Josephat Torner, an albino activist who has dedicated his life to raising awareness and acceptance towards albinos in his country, while debunking the widespread myths and superstitions surrounding the congenital disorder.

Watch “Europe or Die: Storming Spain’s Razor-Wire Fence” – http://bit.ly/1FoHUxO

Read: “Fueled by Superstition, People Are Violently Attacking Albinos in Tanzania” – http://bit.ly/1FoGFyR

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VICE News Daily: Beyond The Headlines – May, 2 2014

The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Ukraine reinstates military conscription and expels Russia’s military attaché on suspicion of spying, the Danish government suspends adoptions from Nigeria, hundreds of Africans trying to rush the Spanish border clash with border police, and Dutch police arrest Greenpeace activists trying to stop delivery of the world’s first shipment of Arctic oil.

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UKRAINE
Government Reinstates Conscription, Expels Russian Diplomat
Ukraine’s acting president issues a decree restoring military conscription, and Russia’s military attaché is expelled reportedly for spying.

DENMARK
Government Suspends Adoptions from Nigeria
Danish minister issues decision after Nigerian police make arrests related to so-called baby factory allegations.

SPAIN
Migrants Clash with Police in Attempted Border Breach
Around 700 African migrants confront border police while trying to reach Melilla.

THE NETHERLANDS
Police Arrest Activists Trying to Stop Shipment of Arctic Oil
Dutch anti-terror police arrest 44 Greenpeace activists but most are later released without charge.

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