King of Jordan visits Downing Street | AFP

King Abdullah II of Jordan is welcomed to 10 Downing Street by Prime Minister Boris Johnson. IMAGES

Abonnez-vous à la chaîne de l’AFP, et pensez à activer les notifications 🔔
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCckz6n8QccTd6K_xdwKqa0A/?sub_confirmation=1

France’s Macron meets with King Abdullah II of Jordan

French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron welcome King Abdullah II of Jordan and Queen Rania to the Elysee palace. The two leaders are expected to discuss the situation in Syria, and in Israel and the Palestinian territories. IMAGES

Pompeo reassures Jordan amid Syria drawdown plans

(8 Jan 2019) US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Tuesday held face to face meetings with Jordan’s King Abdullah II amid confusion over conflicting Trump administration statements about a planned US troop withdrawal from Syria. (Jan. 8)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/74a8eaeac95df1cc7c2b6a5866bd7b8f

Jerusalem is the ‘key to stability’ of entire Middle East

Jerusalem is the ‘key to stability’ of entire Middle East says Jordan’s King Abdullah at a press conference alongside Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. It comes following an announcement by US President Donald Trump in which he unveilled an intention to recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. SOUNDBITE

We should listen to Syrian people, this is democracy of the new world – advisor to Saudi king

As the conflicts in Syria and Yemen intensify, the speaker of Russia’s upper house of parliament has held talks with the Saudi king about possible ways forward. Dr Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Rabiah, an adviser to the Saudi Royal Court and Supervisor-General at King Salman Humanitarian aid and relief centre, talks to RT

RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air

Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday

Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews
Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com
Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt
Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT
Listen to us on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/rttv

RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.

‘These heinous acts by the Assad regime cannot be tolerated’ – Trump on alleged chemical gas attack

US president Donald Trump has said his attitude toward Syrian President Bashar Assad has “changed very much,” after Tuesday’s alleged chemical attack in Idlib. In a joint news conference with Jordan’s King Abdullah, Trump declined to say what his response will be, telling reporters that “militarily, I don’t like to say where I’m going.”

RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air

Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday

Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews
Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com
Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt
Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT
Listen to us on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/rttv

RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.

Step Inside An ISIS Base That Was Just Liberated | Retaking Mosul (HBO)

The Iraqi-led offensive to take back the city of Mosul from the Islamic State terrorist group drags into its third week. Coalition forces are now digging in for a drawn-out, house-to-house fight in a city riddled with tunnels and rigged with improvised explosive devices.

“We want to do it quickly, but in Bashiqa it’s been two years that Daesh [IS] is working on the buildings,” peshmerga commander Najat Abdullah told VICE News correspondent Seb Walker in Bashiqa, east of Mosul. “A lot of mines have been placed in the roads, approximately 10 to 15 massive ones have exploded around my troops.”

Commander Abdullah’s forces discovered an abandoned IS base that the terrorists had fled in haste, leaving behind their weapons and documents. Tunnels underneath the base revealed an underground network of improvised explosive devices.

The offensive has been grueling and is expected to drag on for weeks. But last week Iraqi forces saw some notable gains when they killed 116 IS fighters in bombing raids and breached the city’s outer limits for the first time in more than two years.

This segment originally aired Oct. 31, 2016, on VICE News Tonight on HBO.

Read: “I used to live in Mosul” – http://bit.ly/2f9YqIm

Read: “Photos show daily life around Mosul as Iraqi forces battle ISIS” – http://bit.ly/2fS1Nad

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo

Protests Over Voting Fraud: Elections in Afghanistan (Dispatch 5)

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

In the space of a few short days, Afghan presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah went from confident frontrunner to aggrieved underdog as his rival, Ashraf Ghani, took a surprise lead. Abdullah promptly announced that he rejected the preliminary election results and demanded the resignation of the head of the election commission, Zia-ul-Haq Amarkhail, amid accusations of ballot tampering.

Peaceful street protests in support of Abdullah sprung up across central Kabul, echoing the protests of the Arab Spring. When Amarkhail resigned after Abdullah’s team released audio tapes of him allegedly discussing large-scale electoral fraud, Abdullah’s campaign seemed revitalized, culminating in a large Friday demonstration in the center of Kabul during which Abdullah personally addressed his supporters.

While the peaceful nature of the demonstrations illustrate how far Afghanistan has come since 2001, the political deadlock is now edging the country toward crisis, with no sense of how or when the high-stakes political drama will end.

Elections in Afghanistan playlist: http://bit.ly/1qyydpe

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

The Rise of British Jihadists in Syria

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Britain’s young Muslims are taking the fight against President Bashir al-Assad from UK towns to the frontlines of Syria. VICE News headed to the civil war-torn country to follow Amer Deghayes, a 20-year-old former student from Brighton, who joined the “holy war” against his father’s wishes after carrying out extensive research online.

We joined Amer after the death of his 18-year-old brother Abdullah, who died in a fierce battle against Assad forces in northern Syria. Undeterred by the bloody and brutal conflict, Amer’s 16-year-old brother Jaffer has since met up with him in Syria.

The UK is now attempting to combat, block, and remove thousands of items of “jihadist propaganda” from the internet in an attempt to deter Britons from taking up arms abroad. For Amer, the power of jihadist social media — which promotes stories of jihadi legend, martyrdom, and paradise — opened his eyes to the suffering of Muslims in Syria.

England is also now citing returning militants as “the biggest security threat to the United Kingdom.” The government’s position could leave Amer — and the possibly thousands of unknown British fighters — stranded in increasingly fierce and bloody conflicts, and within the grasp of extremist jihadist groups.

Pro-ISIS Recruitment Video Encourages Foreign Fighters to Join Jihad: https://news.vice.com/article/pro-isis-recruitment-video-encourages-foreign-fighters-to-join-jihad

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

Accusations of Fraud on Election Day: Elections in Afghanistan (Dispatch 2)

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

The final round of Afghanistan’s presidential elections took place with a relatively low death toll — a quiet kind of victory for nation’s fledgling democracy. Inside Kabul, the Taliban fired a few rockets harmlessly towards the northern suburbs after daybreak, as if for form’s sake. But the election went ahead anyway, with small trickles of voters filing into polling centers across the capital throughout the day.

Lines were almost non-existent, an outcome political activists ascribed variously to the fierce heat, lack of ballot papers, increased efficiency on behalf of the electoral commission and voter apathy. Polls since the first round of voting showed Dr. Abdullah Abdullah taking a solid lead over his opponent, former World Bank economist Dr. Ashraf Ghani. But at each of the three polling centers VICE News visited, almost every voter interviewed claimed to have cast their vote for Ghani, implying the final result may be closer than anyone expected.

Electoral monitors for both candidates traded accusations of attempted fraud, with Abdullah taking the lion’s share of the blame. At the polling center in Kabul’s upper-middle class District 10, VICE News witnessed a secret policeman escorted away by stern-faced soldiers after being caught attempting to vote for Abdullah twice.

In a month’s time, the ballot papers from Afghanistan’s provinces will have been counted at least, those from where voting was possible and Afghanistan will have a new president. Depending on the closeness of the results, the transition to a new administration may take place smoothly, or may be marred by accusations of electoral fraud and voter intimidation.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/

VICE News Interviews Abdullah Abdullah: Elections in Afghanistan (Dispatch 1)

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

There’s an eerie sense of calm to Kabul ahead of Saturday’s elections, as government security forces place the city under lockdown in an attempt to neutralise any Taliban attacks before they happen. The first round of the presidential elections, back in April, were surprisingly peaceful- at least within the Kabul security bubble- but the Taliban have publicly vowed to disrupt Saturday’s runoff, warning voters to stay away from polling stations. Rumors are swirling around the capital of Taliban assault teams already in place and armed with heavy weapons and magnetic bombs, and in response army, police and intelligence service checkpoints have sprung up on every intersection in Kabul, choking the city’s already dense traffic into a packed stream of honking horns and eye-watering exhaust fumes. The Taliban threat is very real: only last week, the frontrunner, presidential candidate Dr Abdullah Abdullah narrowly survived a coordinated suicide bomb attack which killed three of his staff and a number of bystanders, reducing his armoured car to a shrapnel-peppered hunk of charred steel.

Since then, Abdullah’s electioneering has been restricted to his fortified Kabul compound, with streams of tribal elders and representatives of the country’s interest groups different filing into his media centre throughout the day to listen to near-identical speeches and announce their support for his presidential bid. VICE NEWS was granted a brief audience with Abdullah, in which he brushed aside the suggestion that the sudden jihadist blitzkrieg on Iraq heralded a glimpse of Afghanistan’s future after ISAF troops pull out.

“Those are very serious events,” Abdullah said, “[but] in Afghanistan the majority of the people have rejected the Talibanization of the country. They don’t have a place, and I am sure that with the legitimacy of the future government based on transparent elections, the state institutions will be strengthened. I am not concerned about that scenario here in Afghanistan. Security is a challenge for the country and will be a challenge for the country, and support from the international community will be needed. There are problems, there are challenges, but there are ways to deal with it.”

Asked whether he saw a negotiated settlement between an Abdullah administration and the Taliban who’d just tried to assassinate him, he remarked that “the end result, the projection of the end of this conflict, of course there needs to be a negotiated settlement. When is it that it is possible to achieve it, that’s a different issue. That does not mean we should not take serious steps and genuine steps to pursue negotiations, but that does not take one side; it also takes the other side. So, on the Afghan side I think genuine serious efforts for pursuing negotiations and offers should be made. At the same time we should protect our own citizens, we should strengthen the security of the country and pursue the programmes which is dealing with the priorities of the majority of the people, like governance, like the fight against corruption, rule of law, and delivering to the people the delivery of services.”

In practice, Afghanistan’s central government has a shaky hold at best on much of the country, severely limiting its ability to provide any of the above aspirations outside major urban centres. But Kabul, buoyed, until recently, by an economic boom derived from aid money, expats and local corruption and secured like a fortress by its heavy foreign and Afghan military presence, presents a vision of what a semi-stable future Afghanistan might look like. A violence-free election will provide a major propaganda boost for the incoming government, and the security services have thrown vast resources at ensuring this outcome. In a bid to reassure the populace polling day will take place smoothly, Kabul’s police chief summoned dozens of journalists on a tour of the city, cramming dozens of cameramen into police pickup trucks, which careered around the congested streets in a long convoy of blaring sirens and shakily-held camcorders, producing choking clouds of dust and the bewilderment of passersby.

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/